Adams creed

Adams belief (waves and tides)
Slide #1 of Libb Thims 2015 "Zerotheism for Kids" class, showing Henry Adams' core belief discerned by him at the age of 25, therein forming belief #2 of zerotheism. [3]
In beliefs, Adams creed, or Adams’ conjecture, refers to Henry Adams' 1863 (age 25) statement, amounting to his, in effect, atheist’s creed, of how he believed there to exist a secret principle, comprised of regular waves (rhythm) and tides (rhyme), amid the ongoing operation of the the universe, similar to how Newton (1679 | age 37) and Goethe (SN:1) (1774 | age 25), before him, expressed similar views; and "one nature" ideology underlying all phenomena and activity, subatomic to atomic to social to galactic and beyond.

Overview
In 1863, American thinker Henry Adams (SN:2), writing to his intellectual friend Charles Gaskell, outlined his views on he intuited a universal theory of existence, applicable, in a one nature manner, atoms to humans: [1]

“Everything in this universe has its regular waves and tides. Electricity, sound, the wind, and I believe every part of organic nature will be brought someday within this law. The laws which govern animated beings will be ultimately found to be at bottom the same with those which rule inanimate nature, and as I entertain a profound conviction of the littleness of our kind, and of the curious enormity of creation, I am quite ready to receive with pleasure any basis for a systematic conception of it all. I look for regular tides in the affairs of man, and, of course, in our own affairs. In ever progression, somehow or other, the nations move by the same process which has never been explained but is evident in the oceans and the air. On this theory I should expect at about this time, a turn which would carry us backward.”

Adams would spend the next 50-years on this subject, becoming one of the first dual pioneers, following Goethe, of human chemistry (see: HC pioneers) and human thermodynamics (see: HT pioneers).

In 2008, American comparative literature scholar Matthew Taylor, in his PhD dissertation, digressed on this belief quote of Adams and his physics-based theory of human existence. [2]

In 2015, American electrochemical engineer Libb Thims used the Adams belief statement as zerotheism "belief #2" taught to six kids during his "Zerotheism for Kids" lecture. [3]

References
1. (a) Adams, Henry. (1863). “Letter to Charles Gaskell”, Oct.
(b) Adams, Henry. (1982). The Letters of Henry Adams, Volume 1: 1858-1868 (editor: Jacob Levenson) (pgs. 395-96). Harvard University Press.
(c) Stevenson, Elizabeth. (1997). Henry Adams: a Biography (pg. 69). Transaction Publishers.
(d) Taylor, Matthew A. (2008). Universes Without Selves: Cosmologies of the Non-Human in American Literature (pg. 108), PhD dissertation, Johns Hopkins University. ProQuest, 2009.
2. Taylor, Matthew A. (2008). Universes Without Selves: Cosmologies of the Non-Human in American Literature (pg. 108), PhD dissertation, Johns Hopkins University. ProQuest, 2009.
3. Thims, Libb. (2015). “Zerotheism for Kids” (co-host: Thor) (main), 14-part [4:41-hr] lecture playlist (Ѻ), 5-intro sides (Ѻ), 56-main sides (Ѻ), 11AM-3PM, Chicago, recorded: Aug 10; published: Sep 7.

TDics icon ns

More pages