Charles Blount

In existographies, Charles Blount (1654-1693) (FA:53) was an English philosopher, Hobbesian, stoicism devotee, and characterized “practical atheist” (Ѻ), noted for []

Overview
In 1679, Blount, in his Anima Mundi or World Soul (Ѻ): an Historical Narration of the Opinions of the Ancients Concerning Man’s Soul after this Life according to Unenlightened Nature, prefaced as an “atheistical, heretical pamphlet”, wherein he aims to “compare Christianity with paganism”. [1]

In 1683, Blount, in his Miracles: No Violations of the Laws of Nature, combined quotations from Bishop Burnet, Thomas Hobbes, Benedict Spinoza, among others, in an attempt to prove that accounts of miracles are without factual basis. [2]

Reaction end

Blount, after he grew ill, killed himself (suicide), an act that has been long-cited as proof of his commitment to stoicism over Christianity ideas. [4]

Miracles, No Violations of the Laws of Nature (pg. 1)
First page of Blount's 1683 Miracles: No Violations of the Laws of Nature, wherein he attempt say that authors of the Bible did not aim to teach people about physical science and natural philosophy, but only to "excite pious affections, so to induce worship and veneration" of god. [2]
Quotes | Employed
The following are quotes employed by Blount:

“After death no thing is, and no thing death [dies?].”
Seneca (50AD), favorite Blount quote

Quotes | On
The following are quotes on Blount:

“Jacob Reimann, in his Universal History of Atheism (1725), included as atheists: Thomas Hobbes, John Toland, Charles Blount, and Anthony Collins.”
Jennifer Hecht (2003), Doubt: a History [3]

Quotes | By
The following are quotes by Blount:

“There are two forts of judges unto whom all writers are obnoxious, viz. the ignorant, and the judicious. As for the ignorant, they are such men as I before was speaking of, then whose approbation I dread nothing more: simili simile gaudet [‘like rejoices in like’] (Ѻ), is a maxim that holds true as well in all other things, as physics; and there is nothing would make me have so ill an opinion of myself, as to hear one of them commend me. But the other judge, viz. the man of learning and judgment, is the he I fear, and before him only will I arraign myself.”
— Charles Blount (1679), Anima Mundi (to the readers) [1]

References
1. Blount, Charles. (1679). Anima Mundi (World Soul): an Historical Narration of the Opinions of the Ancients Concerning Man’s Soul after this Life according to Unenlightened Nature. Will Cademan.
2. Blount, Charles. (1683). Miracles: No Violations of the Laws of Nature (GB)(Ѻ). Robert Sollers.
3. (a) Reimann, Jacob F. (1725). Universal History of Atheism (Historia universalis atheismi et atheorum falso et merito suspectorum). Publisher.
(b) Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 335). HarperOne
4. Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 337-38). HarperOne.

Further reading
● Blount, Charles. (c.1685). Oracles of Reason: Lucretius Redivivus. Publisher.
● Patrick, David and Groome, Francis. (1907). Chambers' Biographical Dictionary: The Great of All Times and Nations (Blount, pg. 106). Publisher.
● Sheppard, Kenneth. (2015). Anti-Atheism in Early Modern England 1580-1720: The Atheist Answered and His Error Confuted (Blount, 41+ pgs). Brill.

External links
Charles Blount (deist) – Wikipedia.

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