Creationist thermodynamicist

In hmolscience, creationist thermodynamicist, an oxymoron, is a thermodynamicist who believes that people were "created" by god (a creator) and or that the the laws of thermodynamics are god's laws and or god's will at work in human affairs, among other variants; someone with conflicting set of beliefs.

List
The following are thermodynamics professors who believe in creation, i.e. that they were created by god:




1.James Joule 75James Joule
(1818-1889)
English physicist
1843 Religion icon 20x27He believed that his numerous experiments on the calculation of the mechanical equivalent of heat, e.g. his Niagara falls honey moon trip temperature measurements, were the means to justify the validity of the descriptions of churning of water as described in creation of the world according Genesis; he even lectured in churches on this.
2.William Thomson (75px)William Thomson
(1824-1907)
Irish-born Scottish physicist-mathematician
1852 Religion icon 20x27In 1852, stylized the second law around discussion of “vegetable life” and the “will of animate creators”; in 1862, was arguing against Darwin’s evolution theory; by 1897, he was arguing for all sorts of religion explicit ideas (see: Thomson on religion).
3.Mehdi Bazargan 75Mehdi Bazargan (1907-1995)
Iranian mechanical engineer and thermodynamicist
1942Islam 20hWrote on “The Thermodynamics of Love” (c.1942), Labor in Islam (1946), wrote a chapter on physiological thermodynamics of human labor in the context of will power, Human Thermodynamics (1956), wherein he used a thermodynamics-based framework, conceptualized as "Allah's will based", in particular Helmholtz free energy equation (adjacent) to explain Islam, work, death, desire, love, and reincarnation scientifically.
4.Gordon Van Wylen 75Gordon Van Wylen (1920-)
American mechanical engineer
1959Religion icon 20x27His Fundamentals of Classical Thermodynamics, included an unusual, to-common-practice, paragraph, wherein he cites the laws of thermodynamics as being man’s description of god’s continuing work.
5.Frederick Rossini 75Frederick Rossini (1899-1990)
American chemical thermodynamicist
1971Religion icon 20x27Was a devout Catholic who, like Mirza Beg (Allah's will based), believed that chemical thermodynamics and physical chemistry described human social interactions, but that this was god working through his laws:

“The point of all of this is that our creator has fashioned laws that are deep seated and broadly applicable, that science is heavily intertwined in our everyday life, frequently without our realization, that we need to break down the compartmentalization of knowledge, that we need to work for a unification of learning, and that we need to understand better the meaning and purpose of life.”
— Frederick Rossini (1971), “Chemical Thermodynamics in the Real World” [1]
6.Mirza Beg 75Mirza Beg
(1932)
Pakistani organometallic chemist
1987Islam 20his New Dimensions in Sociology: a Physico-Chemical Approach to Human Behavior, outlines the subject of "physicochemical sociology" via chemical thermodynamics, conceived as the Allah's will based.
7.Nedjeljka Petric 75Nedjeljka Petric
(c.1941-)
Croatian chemical engineer and thermodynamicist
1991Religion icon 20x27Published “Application of the Thermodynamic Theory to Social Events”, in the International Review of Modern Sociology, wherein she argues, similar to Rossini, that entropy, as defined by the Boltzmann equation, is interpreted not as disorder but as freedom of individuals; this was followed by the publication of three more articles, over the next three years, in which she tries to explain the “spiritual condition” of a person, albeit mostly in a rather overt ontic opening theory manner, replete with attempts to side God, Jesus Christ, and Bible themed views.
8.Andrew McIntosh 75Andrew McIntosh (c.1950-)
English thermodynamics professor
1999Religion icon 20x27Believes that thermodynamics applies to human interactions, but uses a double ontic opening (information + teleonomy) to allow the work of god into the picture.
9.Juliana Boerio-Goates 75Juliana Goates
(c.1953-)
American physical chemist and chemical thermodynamicist
2000Religion icon 20x27Posted on the door to Boerio-Goates’ office is the eighth verse from Micah, chapter 6:

“And what does the Lord require of you but to do justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your god?”
Bible (100AD), Micah 6:8 (ΡΊ), posted above Juliana Goates’ office door (compare: Johannes Wislicenus)

The verse is there, she says, because “that’s how I view things and how I remind myself what I think is important.” In 2001 Boerio-Goates contributed a chapter to the book Finding God at BYU. Her essay, “A Catholic Rediscovers God,” describes how being a minority in the constant company of Latter-day Saint colleagues, students, and neighbors compelled her to examine her own religion more closely and recommit herself to it. In her physical science class, she makes an announcement in the first lecture about her deep Catholic faith, which is typically greeted with an audible gasp. Her studies of chemistry and thermodynamics, supposedly, have instilled in her the belief that the universe has been under the operation of a “divine Creator with an intellect”.
10.Gilbert Wedekind 75Gilbert Wedekind (c.1946-)
American thermodynamics professor, engineer, and pastor
2003Religion icon 20x27His book Spiritual Entropy attempts to explain what the second law has to say about the social, moral, and spiritual realms; he seems to advocate both creationism and intelligent design.
11.DMR Sekhar 75DMR Sekhar (1952-)
Indian chemical engineer and mineral engineer
2006Hinduism iconUses his theory of "genopsych", an entropy antonym, to argue for god inside of genes model of self-motion (or self-drive) theory.

(add discussion)

Quotes
The following are related quotes:

“The point of all of this is that our creator has fashioned laws that are deep seated and broadly applicable, that science is heavily intertwined in our everyday life, frequently without our realization, that we need to break down the compartmentalization of knowledge, that we need to work for a unification of learning, and that we need to understand better the meaning and purpose of life.”
Frederick Rossini (1971), “Chemical Thermodynamics in the Real World” [1]

References
1. Rossini, Frederick D. (1971). “Chemical Thermodynamics in the Real World” (abs) (pdf), Priestley Medal Address, delivered Mar 29 at the national American Chemical Society meeting, Los Angeles, California; in: Chemical Engineering News, April 5, 49 (14): 50-53.

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