Curtis Blakely

Curtis Blakely nsIn human physics, Curtis R. Blakely (c.1970-) is an American justice systems professor noted for his 2010 to present work on the physics or rather social physics of prisons.

Overview
In 2010, Blakely, in his “Sub-atomic Particles and Prisoners: A Novel Examination of Socio-Physics and Penology”, explaind how he had to learn sociophysics, all on his own, so to be able to apply theory to penology cogently, and calls for the launching of sociophysics as a formal discipline. [1]

Education
Blakely completed bachelors and masters degree from University of Nebraska and a PhD in Sociology/Criminal Justice from Southern Illinois University. In 2009, he became a justice systems professor at Truman State University.

See also
Maurice Hauriou | judicial social mechanics theory (1899)
Bertrand Roehner | molecular inmate suicide theory (2005)

References
1. Blakely, Curtis R. (2010). “Sub-atomic Particles and Prisoners: A Novel Examination of Socio-Physics and Penology”, International Journal of Criminal Justice Sciences, 5(2): 264-74.

Further reading
● Blakely, Curtis R. (2013). “Thermodynamics, Newtonian Motion, and the Prison: the Effects of Energy, Entropy and Mass on Rehabilitation”, Prison Service Journal, March, 206:31-35.
● Blakely, Curtis and Walkley, Alice. (2010). “A Physicist, a Philosopher and a Politician: What Penologists can Learn from Einstein, Kant and Churchill”, Internet Journal of Criminology.

External links
Curtis Blakely (faculty) – Truman State University.

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