Death and Resurrection of Osiris

Resurrection of OsirisIn religio-mythology, Death and Resurrection of Osiris, as can be contrasted with the Death and Resurrection of Jesus, the monotheistic rescript of the former, is a core story of Egyptian mythology, the most famous of them all, wherein Osiris is killed by his brother Set, for insult sleeping with Set's wife Nephthys, by accident (Osiris thinking Nephthys was his wife Isis, twin sister to Nephthys), who is then chopped into 14 pieces (see: Orion), then reassembled into a mummy by Isis, then resurrected (brought back to life) by the combined powers of Isis and Thoth, who stops time long enough for the revived Osiris to magically impregnate Isis, who then gives birth to Horus, who then avenges his father's death by killing Set, therein bring order back to the cosmos; the story was rewritten, monotheistically, in circa 200 to 800AD, into the sold-for-realism story of virgin birth and death and resurrection of Jesus.

Overview
In 1873, Auguste Mariette, in his Dendera (see: Dendera temple), published series of about 25 story-board like illustrations, sketched by his artist [name], of carved scenes, at the Dendera Temple, of the death and resurrection of Osiris. [1] In 1904, Wallis Budge, in his The Gods of the Egyptians, Volume Two, steps through 23 of the Mariette illustrations. [2] In 1911, Budge, in his Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, chapter 15, of volume two, in particular (shown adjacent), goes through all of the Mariette illustrations, among others, to fully step through the death and resurrection of Osiris. [3]

The following shows the 25-main storyboard scenes, sketched by Mariette (1873), numbered according to Budge (1904) dating, with some extra images added in from Budge (1911), where indicated (e.g. 13b), of the death, resurrection conception of Horus sex act, and resurrection of Osiris in to the afterlife, as carved on the walls of the Dendera Temple, made in 100BC to 37AD, shown, with recent photos, e.g. by Mick Palarczyk, of the scenes, when available: [4]

#0 | Death of Osiris
#0a | Set throwing Osiris into Nile
#0b | Tearing up of Osiris
#0c | Isis recollecting Osiris

#1#2#3#4#5#6#7#8#9#10#11#12
#13 | Jesus Anointed
#13a | Jesus Anointed
#14#15#16#16a | Opening of the Mouth
#17 | Raising of Lazarus
#17b | Raising of Lazarus#18 | Christmas Tree
#19#20 | Virgin Birth / Resurrection of Jesus
#20b | Horus Grown
#20#21#22 | Resurrection of Osiris
#23 | Osiris Resurrection
#23a | Osiris Resurrection
#23b










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Osiris treeSet throwing chest of Osiris into Nile
Set chopping up Osiris
Isis collecting the pieces of OsirisOsiris at Dendera (Budge, 1911)No. 1No. 2No. 3


[Image]



[Image]


No. 6



[Image]
No. 8


[Image]



[Image]



[Image]
Dendera Temple (scene #12)


Isis and Nephths providing Osiris with Air

No. 13
Anubis anointing Osiris

No. 14 2

No. 16Horus Opening the mouth of OsirisNo. 17Osiris of HermopolisNo. 18




No. 20
Horus in Dendera

No. 22

No. 23 2
Resurrection of Osiris (Philae)
Judgment Hall



Budge (1911): A bas-relief at Dendera showing the funeral coffer (chest) of Osiris, within which he was trapped by Set, via a ruse, at the dinner party; around the chest grows the “Erica tree” (or Persia tree or tamarind tree, depending on version) [see: Christmas tree]; at the head stand Nephthys and at the foot is Isis. [5] Set then threw the chest (Ѻ), containing the body of Osiris into Nile, as shown above. (Ѻ) A visual of Set chopping of the body of Osiris, as told in the Passion of Osiris, after he had found that Isis had recovered the "chest", which had grown into a tree, scattering the 14 pieces of Osiris (see: Orion) about the land.A visual of Isis, gathering up the scattered pieces of the body of Osiris, in preparation to make a "mummy" of his body, so to resurrect him. According to legend, the phallus was eaten by a fish, and never found, therefore Isis cuts off her thumb to make a make-shift phallus for Osiris.
Budge (1904): Osiris lying on his stomach on his bier, beneath which are his four crowns; he is called, "Osiris, beloved of his father, the gods, the lord of life, Osiris’. In front of Osiris is Horus, who presents him with a lotus flower. [2] Budge (1904): Osiris lying on his funeral bier; at the head stands Nephthys, and at the foot Isis. [2] Budge (1904): Osiris, ithyphallic, and wearing the Atef Crown, lying on his bier. On the head of the bier is a hawk with outstretched wings, and behind it stands Isis; on the foot is a similar hawk, and behind it stands Horus.[2]Budge (1904): Osiris, naked and beardless, lying on his bier, at the head of which is a statue of Isis, and at the foot a statue of Nephthys. [2]Budge (1904): Osiris, naked and beardless, lying on his bier, at the head of which stands Isis who is addressing the god; beneath the bier are figures of the four children of Horus, Mestha, Hapi, Tuamutef, and Qebhsennuf, who, besides representing the gods of the four cardinal points, may here be considered as personifications of the four large, internal organs of the body. [2]Budge (1904): Osiris, naked, lying upon his bier, over the foot of which is the vulture goddess Uatchet, and over the head the uraeus goddess Nekhebet. [2]Budge (1904): Osiris, in mummied form, lying on his bier beneath a funeral chest, over which a hawk stretches out its wings. [2]Budge (1904): OsirisOsiris of Behutet H of Behutet (Edfu) lying on his bier, with Nephthys at his head and Isis at his feet. [2]Budge (1904): Osiris of Ta-khent lying on his bier, with a Hawk-goddess at the head and a Vulture-goddess at the foot. [2]Budge (1904): Osiris of HapHap H wearing the Atef Crown, lying face downwards on his bier, beneath which are a number of crowns and caps of the god. [2]Budge (1904): Osiris lying on his bier in the Meskhen chamber with the four funeral vases beneath. [2] Budge (1904): Osiris, ithyphallic, mummied, and beardless, lying on his bier; he is watched over by three hawks, and by Isis, who stands at the head, and by a frog-headed form of the god Horus. Beneath the bier are the ape-headed god Aurt [], and two snake goddesses, one of which is called Her-Tept [], and an ibis-headed god. [2] Budge (1911): Isis and Nephthys providing Osiris with Air. [7]
Budge (1911): Anubis "anointing" (see: Christ) the mummy of Osiris with Isis giving directions. [6]


Budge (1911): Horus opening the mouth and two eyes (see also: eye of Horus) of Osiris with a spear. [7] This, from an astro-theological point of view, supposedly, as something to do with the “big dipper” (the opener) and the “raising” of the Orion (Osiris) constellation in Nov and Dec, visually speaking. Budge (1904): Osiris, beardless, and wearing the White Crown and plumes, in the act of raising himself from his bier at the command of Heru-netch-tef-f [Horus]. [2] The "Hermopolis version" of Osiris, one of about 16 varieties, of Horus (god the son, aka baby Jesus) raising Osiris (aka god the father), next to the Persia tree (Erica tree), aka Christmas tree, with the Ba or soul of Osiris, aka Christmas tree angel resting (hovering) above the tree, as depicted during the Khoiak festival, on one of the walls of the Dendera Temple. [9]Budge (1904): Osiris Un-nefer, in mummied form, lying on his bier, at the head of which grows the Persea tree [Christmas tree], Ashet Ashet H; above the upper branches stands a soul [Christmas tree angel] in the form of a man-headed hawk. [2]
Budge (1904): Osiris, ithyphallic and bearded, in mummied form, lying upon his bier; over his feet and his body hover two hawks. At the head kneels Hathor, ‘Mistress of Amentet’, who weepeth for ‘her brother’, and at the foot is a frog, symbol of the. goddess Heqet []; beneath the bier are an ibis-headed god holding the Utchat, two serpents, and the god Bes. It is interesting to note that the frog-headed goddess Meget, who was a form of Hathor, was connected the Christians with the Christian resurrection; in proof of this may be cited the lamp described by Signore Lazone [Dizionario, pg. 853], wherein he tells us, is a figure of a frog, and the legend [Greek] or ‘I am the resurrection’.” Palarczyk (c.2015): A relief in the Hathor Temple at Dendera shows Horus of Edfu, sitting on a throne and wearing the combined crowns of Upper and Lower Egypt. The relief is located on the (interior) eastern wall of the outer hypostyle hall of the temple and dates from the first century AD. [4]


Budge (1904): Osiris rising up out of a basket (?), which rests upon a pedestal; behind him stands Isis with her wings stretched out on both sides of him, and before him is a bearded god [?] who presents to him "life" [Ankh] On the right is a second scene in which the god [Osiris] is seen kneeling within the boat of the double TetDouble Tet H wherein are a papyrus plant and a lotus plant, the emblems of the South and North respectively. The boat rests upon a sledge, the supports of which are made in the form of inverted lotus flowers, which are well known types of the dawn and of renewed life. The title of the god here is ‘Osiris Seker, lord of the funeral chest [at] Abydos’ Osiris Seker H. [2] Budge (1911): a depiction of the Raising of Osiris at the Temple at Philae (Ѻ), built on an island near the Aswan Low Dam in 380 to 145BC. [8] A depiction, from the Papyrus of Ani (1300BC), of Osiris, after being resurrected, in the Judgment Hall, judging the souls of the deceased, as they are brought, one by one, into the Hall, by Horus, to have the 42 parts of their souls weighed (see: negative confessions), and moral worth of their existence judged by Osiris attended by Isis at is side.


















John 19:25





John 19:33-34




Matthew 27:59-61

























John 19 25 (labeled)

John baptizing Jesus


John 19 33-34



Matthew 27 59-61



No. 23 (photo)




Osiris tomb colored

















The baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist.







Virgin Birth (Dendera) (labeled)



Palarczyk (c.2015): A relief in the northernmost of the western Osiris chapels on the roof of the Hathor Temple at Dendera shows a winged Isis (on the right) watching over the resurrection of her husband Osiris. The chapel was used during the Osiris Festival in the month khoiak, which celebrated the resurrection of Osiris. This part of the Dendera Temple was built during the later Ptolemaic period (first century BC). [4]




Osiris 0 2


























Palarczyk (c.2015): A relief in the northernmost of the western Osiris chapels on the roof of the Hathor Temple at Dendera shows a mummified Osiris lying on a funeral bed. His wife Isis, in the form of a kite, hovers above his erect phallus, ready to be impregnated. It is from this posthumous union that Horus, son of Isis, is born. To the right, sitting on a pedestal, we see Hekat, Goddess of Childbirth, in the form of a frog. On the left is Hathor, her arms outstretched towards Osiris. The chapel was used during the Osiris Festival in the month khoiak, which celebrated the resurrection of Osiris. This part of the Dendera Temple was built during the later Ptolemaic period (first century BC). [4]

















































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Quotes
The following are related quotes:

“On the walls of the temple of Dendera is preserved a very interesting group of scenes connected with the story of the death and resurrection of the god Osiris.”
Wallis Budge (1904), The Gods of the Egyptians (pg. 131)

References
1. (a) Mariette, Auguste. (1873). Dendera (Denderah), tom. iv. Pl 65 ff. Paris: Publisher.
(b) Auguste Mariette – Wikipedia.
2. Budge, Wallis. (1904). The Gods of the Egyptians, Volume Two (Osiris death and ressurection story board, pgs. 131-38). Dover, 1969.
3. (a) Budge, Wallis. (1911). Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, Volume One. P.L. Warner.
(b) Budge, Wallis. (1911). Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, Volume Two. P.L. Warner.
(c) Mariette Dendera (photos & videos) – Isida Project.
4. (a) Dendera Temple (photos) – SmugMug.com.
(b) Mick Palarczyk (about) – Palarczyk.com.
5. (a) Budge, Wallis. (1911). Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, Volume One (Erica tree, pg. 5). P.L. Warner.
(b) Mariette Dendera (photos & videos) – Isida Project.
6. (a) Mariette, Auguste. (1873). Dendera (Denderah), Volume Four (pg. 70). Paris: Publisher.
(b) Budge, Wallis. (1911). Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, Volume Two (pg. 48). P.L. Warner.
7. (a) Mariette, Auguste. (1873). Dendera (Denderah), Volume Four (pg. 75). Paris: Publisher.
(b) Budge, Wallis. (1911). Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, Volume Two (pg. 51). P.L. Warner.
7. (a) Mariette, Auguste. (1873). Dendera (Denderah), Volume Four (pg. 88). Paris: Publisher.
(b) Budge, Wallis. (1911). Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, Volume Two (pg. 54). P.L. Warner.
8. Budge, Wallis. (1911). Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, Volume Two (pg. 58). P.L. Warner.
9. (a) Mariette, Auguste. (1873). Dendera (Denderah), Volume Four (pg. 72). Paris: Publisher.
(b) Budge, Wallis. (1911). Osiris and the Egyptian Resurrection, Volume Two (pg. 40). P.L. Warner.

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