Elizabeth Stanton

Elizabeth StantonIn existographies, Elizabeth Stanton (1815-1902) [HD:28] (FA:105) was an American social activist, noted for being one of the pioneers of “atheist feminism”. (Ѻ)

Overview
In 1848, Stanton, taking up the vocal doubting role of Ernestine Rose’s public atheism, began to engage in the conflicts between the Bible and women’s rights (Ѻ).

Woman’s Bible
See also: Atheist’s bible
In 1895, Stanton published The Woman’s Bible, wherein her and a committee of woman did the following to a standard Bible: [4]

“Those who have been engaged this summer have adopted the following plan, which may be suggestive to new members of the committee. Each person purchased two Bibles, ran through them from Genesis to Revelations, marking all the texts that concerned women. The passages were cut out, and pasted in a blank book, and the commentaries then written underneath.”

Here, of note, we recall a similar manner of cut and paste editing as was done by Thomas Jefferson and his Jefferson Bible.

Quotes | Employed
The following are quotes employed by Stanton:

“Still, it moves.”
Galileo (c.1633), punchline to the Galileo story as told by Stanton (1869) in “The Universal Creed” [1]

Quotes | By
The following are quotes by Stanton:

Harriet Martineau said that the happiest day of her life was the ‘day she gave up charge of her soul’. The happiest period of my life, similarly, has been since the emerging from the shadows and superstitions of the old theologies.”
— Elizabeth Stanton (1885), “The Pleasure of the Ages” [2]

“Clergyman are still preaching sermons on the ‘rib origin’ [of women]!”
— Elizabeth Stanton (1895), speech at 80th birthday celebration, New York Opera House [3]

“I decline to accept Hebrew mythology as a guide to twentieth-century science.”
— Elizabeth Stanton (1902), reply, a few days before her death (Ѻ), to a Bishop who had quoted the Genesis chapter on the rib origin of women to her

References
1. (a) Stanton, Elizabeth C. (1869). “The Universal Creed”, Publisher.
(b) Gaylor, Annie. (1997). Women Without Superstition, No Gods, No Masters: The Collected Writings of Women Freethinkers of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (pg. 137). Freedom From Religion Foundation.
(c) Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 391). HarperOne.
2. (a) Stanton, Elizabeth C. (1885). “The Pleasure of the Ages”, Publisher.
(b) Gaylor, Annie. (1997). Women Without Superstition, No Gods, No Masters: The Collected Writings of Women Freethinkers of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (pg. 150). Freedom From Religion Foundation.
(c) Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 391). HarperOne.
3. Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 392). HarperOne.
4. Stanton, Elizabeth. (1895). The Woman’s Bible (txt). Publisher.

External links
Elizabeth Cady Stanton – Wikipedia.
The Woman’s Bible – Wikipedia.

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