Engine development timeline

In science, engine development timeline traces the chronological development of the modern engine, from the early vacuum lifting devices (Guericke engine, 1850), to the construction of the first gunpowder engine (1678), to the design of the first steam engine (Papin engine, 1690), to the construction of the first operational steam engine (Miner's friend, 1698), to the description of the first theoretical heat engine (Carnot engine 1824).

The following is a chronological listing of the development and invention of engines, the name "steam engine" being a generic name for the the engines built by Papin to Watt, using water as the working body, and the name "heat engine" referring to any body, whatsoever, that produces work by the alternating action of contact with a and a hot body and a cold body.

(make sideways scrolling):

Date
Type
Picture
Description




1647Suction pump

Inventor:
Otto Guericke
(others before?)


1650Piston and cylinder

Inventor:
Otto Guericke
(others before?)
Piston and Cylinder (no shadow)
1650Vacuum pump

Inventor:
Otto Guericke
Vacuum pump
[5]
1654Guericke engine

Inventor:
Otto Guericke
Guericke engine (1854)
1658Pneumatical engine

Inventor:
Robert Hooke
(under direction of Robert Boyle)
pneumatical engineBoyle's pump[4]
1678Gunpowder engine

Inventor:
Christiaan Huygens
Huygens gun powder engineHuygens gun powder engine (lifting boys)[6]
1679Boiling engine
(Papin's digester)

Inventor:
Denis Papin
Papin digester
1685Papin's pneumatic engine for raising water

Inventor:
Denis Papin
Papin’s pneumatic engine for raising water (1685)
1687 Papin’s gunpowder and air engine

Inventor:
Denis Papin
Papin’s gunpowder and air engine (1687)
1690Papin engine

Inventor:
Denis Papin
Papin engine (small)

1698Savery engine
(Miner's friend)
(Savery sump pump)

Inventor:
Thomas Savery
Savery engine (modern)[3]
1712Newcomen engine
(Atmospheric Engine)
(improved Savery engine)

Inventor:
Thomas Newcomen
Newcomen engine
1741Smeaton engine
(improved Newcomen engine)

Inventor:
John Smeaton
Smeaton engine (1741)
1765
to
1796
Watt engine
(improved Newcomen engine)

Inventor:
James Watt
Watt engineAdded separate condenser (1765), sun and planet gear (1781), centrifugal governor (1788), and indicator diagram (1796).
1801Trevithick engine

Inventor:
Richard Trevithick
Trevithick engine (1804)Built the first steam engine automobiles.
1803Woolf engine

Inventor:
Arthur Woolf
Woolf compound engineDesigned an improved boiler for producing high pressure steam (1803) and invented a compound steam engine (1805).
1814Killingworth locomotive

Inventor:
George Stephenson
Killingworth locomotive
1824Carnot engine
(heat engine)

Inventor:
Sadi Carnot
Hot body cold body (diagram)[2]
1969Heat engine (generic)

Author:
Hendrick Van Ness
heat engine (van ness)
2005Human engine
(dihumanid molecular engine)

Author:
Libb Thims (2005)
Barri Gold (2011)
Human engine modelTwo human molecules, one male Mx, one female Fy, in a bonded "working" relationship. [7]
2007Earth surface engines

Author:
Add
Libb Thims (2007)
System (earth-surface)[8]

See also
Timeline of thermodynamics

References
2. Carnot, Sadi. (1824). “Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire and on Machines Fitted to Develop that Power.” Paris: Chez Bachelier, Libraire, Quai Des Augustins, No. 55.
3. Savery, Thomas. (1702). The Miner’s Friend – or an Engine to Raise Water by Fire. London.
4. Boyle, Robert. (1660). New Experiments: Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring of the Air, and its Effects: Made, for the most part, in a New Pneumatical Engine. Publisher.
5. Schott, Gaspar. (1657). Mechanical Hydraulic Pneumatics (Mechanicahydraulica-pneumatica). Würtzburg.
6. Galloway, Robert L. (1881). The Steam Engine and its Inventors. London: MacMillan and Co.
7. History – HumanThermodynamics.com.
8. (a) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume One) (esp. ch. 3). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
(b) Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume Two). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.

Further reading
● Thurston, Robert H. (1886). A History of The Growth of the Steam-Engine (PG). Publisher.

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