Euler genealogy

Euler genealogy








Denied the void
Parmenides 75
Parmenides
(510-450BC)




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Aristotle 75
Aristotle
(384-322BC)

Denied the void

IQ icon=190



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Otto Guericke 75
Otto Guericke (1602-1686)




|(Non-mathematical mentorship)



Gunpowder engine

IQ icon=175
Christiaan Huygens 75
Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695)





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Differential equations

IQ icon=182-205
Leibniz 75
Gottfried Leibniz (1646-1716)





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"Bernoulli brothers"
(differential equations)
Jacob Bernoulli 75
Jacob Bernoulli
(1654–1705)




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"Bernoulli brothers"
(differential equations)
Johann Bernoulli 75
Johann Bernoulli
(1667–1748)




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Leonhard Euler 75
Leonhard Euler
(1707-1783)


IQ icon=185
Jean d’Alembert 75
Jean d’Alembert (1717-1783)


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Lagrangian

IQ icon=185
Lagrange 75
Joseph Lagrange (1736-1813)


Laplace 75
Pierre Laplace (1749-1827)


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(Analytical Theory of Heat)
Joseph Fourier 75
Joseph Fourier (1768-1830)
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Simeon Poisson 75
Simeon Poisson (1781-1840)
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William Hamilton 75
William Hamilton (1805-1865)



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Thermodynamics

IQ icon=190-205
Clausius 75
Rudolf Clausius
(1822-1888)





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Boltzmann 75 new
Ludwig Boltzmann
(1844-1906)
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Gibbs 75 new
Willard Gibbs
(1839-1903)

Chemical thermodynamics


Planck 75
Max Planck
(1858-1947)

Statistical mechanics





IQ icon=182
(Elements)
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Lewis 75
Gilbert Lewis
(1875-1946)



Chemical thermodynamics

Euclid 75
Euclid
(c.340-280BC)

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E = mc²
Relativity


IQ icon=160-225
Einstein 75 (older)
Albert Einstein
(1879-1955)
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Rossini debate
Political thermodynamics
Chemical thermodynamics
Rossini 75
Frederick Rossini
(1899-1990)

Stanley Sandler 75
Stanley Sandler
(1940-)


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Thims 75
Libb Thims
(c.1975-)


In mathematics, Euler genealogy shows the advisor/student relationship, generally PhD advisor / graduate student relation, for the historical mentor-student lineage of Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler and his descendants. The main points of the Euler genealogy are mapped adjacent.

Second to the Euler genealogy is the Johann Pfaff (advisor) Carl Gauss (student) genealogy.

Current director of the Mathematics Genealogy project and Mitchel T. Keller explains, in the following video, how over over one-third of all modern 150,000 known (mapped) mathematicians can trace their genealogy back to ether Euler or Gauss.

Discussion
To note, the mathematical linage from Gottfried Leibniz-Christiaan Huygens on back is not necessarily one of a PhD student / PhD advisor connection, nor is the Leibniz-Jacob Bernoulli connection exactly a PhD student / PhD advisor connection; although Mitchel Keller, Mathematics Genealogy Project head, lists the three (Christiaan HuygensGottfried Leibniz → Jacob Bernoulli) as such. [2]

The so-called “Bernoulli brothers” (Jacob Bernoulli → Johann Bernoulli) (see: Bernoulli family) certainly were among the first to promote Leibniz’s version of calculus, and the older Bernoulli (Jacob) seems to have been the advisor to the younger Bernoulli (Johann), but the connection between Huygens and Leibniz needs to be studied a bit more, as regards to mathematical influences.

In addition, the Otto Guericke → Christian Huygens linkage is not necessarily one of mathematical knowledge genealogy, but rather one of influence, especially in regards to Huygens prolonged effort, in coordinated synergy with Robert Boyle, Denis Papin, and Robert Hooke, to make a working gunpowder engine, and in general study the properties of the vacuum.

Furthermore, it remains to be tracked down how some of the other great mathematical thinkers, such as, in particular, Euclid, fit into the picture as well, being that both James Maxwell and Albert Einstein were greatly influenced by Euclid's Elements.

Quotes | On
The following are related quotes:

Descartes took up almost without change what this anonymous mathematician of the thirteenth century had written; and henceforth, from Descartes to Wallis, from Wallis to Bernoulli, and from the former to Lagrange, then to Gibbs, the principle of virtual displacements continued to be extended.”
Pierre Duhem (1913), “Research on the History of Physical Theories”, in: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science (pg. 242)

See also
Thomson genealogy
● Gauss genealogy

References
1. Leonhard Euler – Mathematics Genealogy Project.
2. Keller, Mitchel T. (2011). “Interview: on Mathematics Genealogy Project”, London School of Economics website, Feb. 23.

Further reading
● Struik, D.J. (1969). A Source Book in Mathematics, 1200-1800 (Euler, 69+ pgs). Harvard University Press.

External links
Gauss and Euler genealogy (pdf) – 3.bp.blogspot.com.

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