Gerald Massey

Gerald Massey 2In existographies, Gerald Massey (1828-1907) (IQ:185|#67) [RGM:506|1,500+] (RE:79) [CR:99] was an English freethinker, poet, archeologist, Egyptologist, evolution advocate, and leading religio-mythology scholar, noted for his 1883 Natural Genesis, wherein he explains how the Christian story of Jesus Christ, the basis of Christianity, is but a re-write of the Egyptian myth of the Egyptian god-human Horus born from the god Osiris and the goddess Isis, aka “Stella Maris” (star of the sea), of the Heliopolis Ennead (9 gods) of Anunian theology in Egyptian cosmology (see: religio-mythology transcription and syncretism). [1]

Poetry
In 1869, Massey published My Lyrical Life: Poems Old and New, which is said (Ѻ) to bear “features of his genius” in a resemblance to Keats, along with thoughts and expressions found within which “remind the reader of Shakespeare.”

Christ-Horus connection
In 1883, Massey, in his chapter eight entitled "The Mythical Christ", of his Natural Genesis, supposedly stated the following:

Christianity was neither original nor unique, but that the roots of much of the Judeo/Christian tradition lay in the prevailing Kamite (ancient Egyptian) culture of the region. We are faced with the inescapable realization that if Jesus had been able to read the documents of old Egypt, he would have been amazed to find his own biography already substantially written some four or five thousand years previously.”

In c.1888, Massey in his “Luniolatry: Ancient and Modern”, was making the following Egyptian-to-Christian transliterations: [8]

“By comparing the various myths with the Gospel versions, we find that

Sut and Horus = Satan and Jesus
Anup and Horus = John and Jesus
The Double Horus = Two-fold Christ
Khunsu = Christ

The French retain a tradition that the man in the moon is Judas Iscariot, who was transported there for his treason to the Light of the World. But that story is pre-Christian, and was told at least some 6,000 years ago of Osiris and the Egyptian Judas, Sut, who was born twin with him of one mother, and who betrayed him, at the Last Supper, into the hands of the 72 Sami, or conspirators, who put him to death. Although the Mythos became solar, it was originally lunar, Osiris and Sut having been twin brothers in the moon.”

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Zeitgeist
In 2007, Massey was a key citation staple of Peter Joseph's viral film Zeitgeist; the following is an example quote:

“They must find it difficult … those who have taken authority as the truth, rather than truth as the authority.”
— Gerald Massey (1883), Natural Genesis, Volume One (title page quote); cited (Ѻ) by Peter Joseph (2006) Zeitgeist

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Horus (see no evil)
A Nov-Dec 2012 issue of Catholic Answers Magazine, shows Horus (left), American atheist-agnostic comedian Bill Maher (center), and Massey (right) (Ѻ) said to be representative how the so-called claim that Jesus is based on the Egyptian god Horus has been making the rounds recently.
Religulous
In 2008, American comedian Bill Maher, a Catholic-Jewish raised person turned skeptical agnostic atheist into his 40s, in his film Religulous, used Massey’s Ancient Egypt: the Light of the World, as the basis of the portion of the film wherein it is argued that the Jesus story is a re-write of the Horus story. [3] In the film, Maher confronts an unprepared Christian with the Horus = Jesus claim; the gist of which is as follows: [10]

Maher: But the Jesus story wasn’t original.

Christian man: How so?

Maher: Written in 1280 BC, the Book of the Dead describes a god, Horus. Horus is the son of the god Osiris, born to a virgin mother. He was baptized in a river by Anup [Anubis] the Baptizer [see: baptism] who was later beheaded. Like Jesus, Horus was tempted while alone in the desert, healed the sick, the blind, cast out demons, and walked on water. He raised Asar from the dead. “Asar” translates to “Lazarus.” Oh, yeah, he also had twelve disciples. Yes, Horus was crucified first, and after three days, two women announced Horus, the savior of humanity, had been resurrected.

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Education
Massey’s first two books, circa age 8 to 12, were the Bible and John Bunyan. He then read Robinson Crusoe, followed by some Wesleyan tracts.

In 1843, Massey, age 15, moved to London, therein discovering English, Roman, and Greek history, where at he procured a voracious appetite for books; which he recounts as follows: (Ѻ)

“Till then [age 15], I had wondered why I lived at all. Now I began to think that the crown of all desire and the sum of all existence was to read and get knowledge. Read! Read! Read! I used to read at all possible places—and in bed till three in the morning—nothing daunted by once setting the bed on fire. Greatly indebted was I also to the bookstalls, where I have read a great deal, often folding a leaf in a book and returning the next day to continue the subject; but sometimes the book was gone, and then great was my grief! When out of a situation, I have often gone without a meal to purchase a book.”

Here he read works by Thomas Paine, Constantin Volney, and Louis Blanc, which he had read prior to 1849. [7]

Quotes | Employed
The following are quotes employed by Massey:

“In the customs and institutions of schools, academies, colleges, and similar bodies destined for the abode of learned men and the cultivation of learning, everything is found adverse to the progress of science. For the lectures and exercises there are so ordered, that to think or speculate on anything out of the common way can hardly occur to any man. And one or two have the boldness to use any liberty of judgment, they must undertake the task all by themselves: they can have no advantage from the company of others. And if they can endure this also, they will find their industry and largeness of mind no slight hindrance to their fortune. For the studies of men in these places are confined and as it were imprisoned in the writings of certain authors, from whom any man dissent he is straightway arraigned as a turbulent person and an innovator.”
Francis Bacon (1620), New Instrument of Science (Ѻ); cited by Gerald Massey (1883) in Natural Genesis, Volume One (pg. iv)

“The few who had the courage to call the child by its right name, the few that knew something of it, who foolishly opened their hearts and revealed their vision to the many, were always burnt or crucified.”
Johann Goethe (c.1810), Source; cited by Gerald Massey (1883) in Natural Genesis, Volume One (pg. iv)

Bind it about thy neck, write it upon the tablet of thy heart: ‘everything of Christianity is of Egyptian origin.”
Robert Taylor (1829), Oakham Gaol; cited by Gerald Massey (1883) in Natural Genesis, Volume One (pg. iv)

“It may be that this fabular relation borders on the verity of physical science.”
Plutarch (100), De Iside (§36) (Ѻ); cited by Gerald Massey (1883) in Natural Genesis, Volume One (pg. iv)

Massey (1889)
An 1889 existography of Massey, from Joseph Wheeler’s Biographical Dictionary of Freethinkers, describing him as a freethinker, poet, and archeologist. [9]
Quotes | On
The following are quotes on Massey:

Massey is a fiery genius who good books warm my chilled heart.”
— Louis Kossuth (c.1885) (Ѻ)

Justin Martyr [c.150] says that Christ was born on the same day on which the sun was re-born in stabulo Augiae, and the stable of Angles, cleansed by Hercules in his sixth labor, corresponds to the cave in Capricorn, which is the cave of Mithra and of the other saviors. Abba Udda, the Akkadian name of the tenth month, answering roughly to Dec, the month of Capricorn, denotes the cave of light. The cave or winter solstice in Capricorn was the birthplace of the Mithraic Messiah from 2410 to 255 BC and this was continued as the cave or birthplace of the Christ after it had ceased to be applicable to the solar god. Justin, however (determined to include both), asserts that Christ was born in the stable and afterwards took refuge in the cave." But no messiah, whether called Mithra, Horus or Christ could have been born in the stable of Augias, or the cave of Abba Udda, on the 25th of Dec, after the date of 255BC because the solstice had passed out of that sign into the constellation of Sagittarius.”
— Robert Shaw (1904), Sketch of the Religions of the World (pg. 209); elaborated re-quote of Gerald Massey (c.1890) in The Historical Jesus and the Mythical Christ (pg. 41)

Massey’s story is that of many men of genius, born in poverty, reared in the school of difficulty, he learned in suffering what he taught in song.”
— James Robertson (1908), Spiritualism: the Open Door to the Unseen Universe (Ѻ)

Massey, with brilliant scholarship and insight, pierced Egypt's enigmatic scriptology, and documented the provenance of both Old and New Testament literature from remote Egyptian sources. He forced us to ask how the four Gospels of the Christian canon could be the biography of any Messianic personality living in the first Christian century, when he traced their texts back to Egyptian documents that must have been venerable even in 3500 BC.”
Alvin Kuhn (1963), A Rebirth for Christianity [2]

Massey, a man of many talents, distinguished himself as a social reformer, a poet and an Egyptologist. His fame rested mainly on the six monumental volumes in which he dealt at length on the mythology and religion of ancient Egypt, and on his poetry. Although he was a capable lecturer, the lectures were not widely circulated, and were privately printed in an obscure volume.”
John Jackson (1976), “Forward” to Gerald Massey Lectures [2]

“Gerald Massey was a man of vivid genius and poetic fire who distinguished himself as a social reformer, a poet, and especially an Egyptologist. His poetry won the admiration of both Tennyson and Ruskin. His fame, however, rests mainly on six monumental volumes that dealt at length with the mythology and religion of ancient Egypt. He studied the extensive Egyptian records housed in the British Museum and taught himself to decipher the hieroglyphics. Although he was a capable lecturer, his speeches and books were not widely circulated. The record shows that his controversial work was considered taboo in what were regarded in his day as respectable literary and religious circles. He was nevertheless light-years ahead of his time.”
Tom Harpur (2004), The Pagan Christ (pg. 9)

“In exploring the various Egyptian influences upon the Christian religion, one name frequently encountered is that of lay Egyptologist Gerald Massey. Born in abject poverty in England, Massey was almost entirely self-taught; yet, he was able to write and lecture about several subjects with tremendous erudition and authority. Despite his lack of formal education, Massey could read several languages, including not only English but also French, Latin, Greek and evidently Hebrew and Egyptian to a certain degree.”
Dorothy Murdock (2008), Christ in Egypt: the Horus-Jesus Connection (Ѻ)

Quotes | By
The following are noted quotes by Massey:

“The child comes into the world like a new coin with the stamp of god upon it.”
— Gerald Massey (1855), Poems and Ballads [6]

“It takes the latter half of all of one’s lifetime to unlearn the falsehood that was instilled into us during the earlier half. Generation after generation we learn, unlearn, and re-learn the same lying legendary lore. Henceforth, our studies must begin from the evolutionist standpoint in order that they may not have to be gone over again.”
— Gerald Massey (1883), The Natural Genesis, Volume One (pg. 2)

“The human mind has long suffered an eclipse and been darkened and dwarfed in the shadow of ideas, the real meaning of which has been lost to the moderns. Myths and allegories whose significance was once unfolded to initiates in the mysteries have been adopted in ignorance and re-issued as real truths directly and divinely vouchsafed to mankind for the first and only time! The earlier religions had their myths interpreted. We have ours misinterpreted. And a great deal of what has been imposed on us as god's own true and sole revelation to man is a mass of inverted myths.”
— Gerald Massey (1883), The Natural Genesis, Volume One (pg. 13); cited by Tom Harpur (2004) in The Pagan Christ (pg. 30)

“The Gospels do not contain the history of an actual man, but the myth of the god-man, Jesus, clothed in an historical dress.”
— Gerald Massey (c.1888), “Luniolatry: Ancient and Modern” [8]

“There are none so blind as those who won’t see, except those who can’t.”
— Gerald Massey (1888), “Are the Teachings Ascribed to Jesus Contradictory?” [5]

“I court honest criticism, and welcome genuine correction. I do not mind being misunderstood, but do resent misrepresentation. I am in search of realities myself, and have no tolerance for men or things in masks. I try to follow truth, like the old Egyptians, my masters, with all the force of sincerity, all the fervor of faith. That is comparatively easy now-a-days when bonfires are no longer made of man or book, and the penalties are so very slight. A loaf or two of bread the less; a greeting here or there with an offensive epithet, a rotten egg, or a dead cat, are things to be smiled at when we remember our forerunners that were her lovers from old, who beat out a pathway for us through all the long dark night of the past, and lit it with illimitable rows of their burning bodies, each turned into a flaming Torch for Truth.”
— Gerald Massey (c.1890), “The Historical Jesus and the Mythical Christ” [4]

“The human soul never was ‘conceived as a bird’, but might be imaged as a bird, according to the primitive system of representation. The golden hawk, for instance, was a bird which typified the sun that soared aloft as Horus in the heavens, and the same bird in the eschatology was then applied to the human soul in its resurrection from the body. Hence the hawk with a human head is a compound image, not the portrait of a human soul. The celestial poultry that pass for angels in the imagination of Christendom have no direct relation to spiritual reality. A ‘feathered angel’ was never yet seen by clairvoyant vision, and is not a result of revelation. We know how they originated, why they were so represented, and where they came from into the Christian eschatology. They are the human-headed birds that were compounded and portrayed for souls in Egypt [see: Egyptian human], and carried out thence into Babylonia, Judea, Greece, Rome, and other lands.”
— Gerald Massey (1907), Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World: a Work of Reclamation and Restitution in Twelve Books, Volume One (pg. 136)

References
1. Massey, Gerald. (1883). The Natural Genesis: or Second Part of a Book of the Beginnings, Containing an Attempt to Recover and Reconstitute the Lost Origins of Myth and mysteries, Types and Symbols, Religion and Language, with Egypt for the Mouthpiece and Africa as the Birthplace (Volume I) (Volume II). London: Williams and Norgate; in: The Natural Genesis: Two Volumes in One. Cosimo, 2011.
2. Massey, Gerald; Jackson, John G; Ferguson, Sibyl. (1900). Gerald Massey Lectures (foreword: John G. Jackson; Introduction: Sibyl Ferguson) (pdf). Samuel Weiser, 1976.
3. (a) Massey, Gerald. (1907). Ancient Egypt: the Light of the World (pgs. 728-914). T. Fisher Unwin.
(b) Christ myth theory (Religulous) – Wikipedia.
4. (a) Massey, Gerald. (c.1890). “The Historical Jesus and the Mythical Christ”, Lecture; in: Gerald Massey Lectures (foreword: John G. Jackson; Introduction: Sibyl Ferguson) (pdf). Samuel Weiser, 1976.
(b) Massey, Gerald. (1900). Gerald Massey Lectures (§1:1-26) (arc). The Book Tree, 2008.
(c) Maxwell, Jordan; Tice, Paul; Snow, Alan. (2000). That Old-Time Religion: the Story of Religious Foundations (§: Astro-Theology: The Historical Jesus and the Mythical Christ, pgs. 5-24; §:The Solar Cult, pgs. 35-54). The Book Tree.
5. Massey, Gerald. (1888). “Correspondence: Are the Teachings Ascribed to Jesus Contradictory?” (Ѻ), Lucifer, 1:135-38.
6. (a) Massey, Gerald. (1855). Poems and Ballads. J.C. Derby.
(b) Curry, D. (1855). “Gerald Massey, the Chartist Poet”, Ladies’ Repository, 15:321-Jun.
(c) Harpur, Tom. (2004). The Pagan Christ (pg. 201). Thomas Allan Publishers.
7. Curry, D. (1855). “Gerald Massey, the Chartist Poet”, Ladies’ Repository, 15:321-24, Jun.
8. (a) Massey, Gerald. (c.1888). “Luniolatry: Ancient and Modern” (abs) (Ѻ), Lecture (37-pgs). Publisher.
(b) Harpur, Tom. (2004). The Pagan Christ (pg. 20). Thomas Allan Publishers.
9. Wheeler, Joseph M. (1889). A Biographical Dictionary of Freethinkers of All Ages and Nations (pg. 221). Progressive Publishing Co.
10. Sorenson, Jan. (2012). “Horus Manure: Debunking the Jesus/Horus Connection” (Ѻ), StrangeNotions.com.

Collected works | Main
● Massey, Gerald. (1869). My Lyrical Life: Poems Old and New, Volume One. K. Paul.
● Massey, Gerald. (1869). My Lyrical Life: Poems Old and New, Volume Two. K. Paul.
● Massey, Gerald. (1881). A Book of the Beginnings, Volume One. Cosimo, 2007.
● Massey, Gerald. (1881). A Book of the Beginnings, Volume Two. Cosimo, 2007.
● Massey, Gerald. (1883). The Natural Genesis: Second Part of a Book of the Beginnings, Containing an Attempt to Recover and Reconstitute the Lost Origins of the Myths and Mysteries, Types and Symbols, Religion and Language, with Egypt for the Mouthpiece and Africa as the Birthplace, Volume One. Williams and Norgate.
● Massey, Gerald. (1883). The Natural Genesis: Second Part of a Book of the Beginnings, Containing an Attempt to Recover and Reconstitute the Lost Origins of the Myths and Mysteries, Types and Symbols, Religion and Language, with Egypt for the Mouthpiece and Africa as the Birthplace, Volume Two. Williams and Norgate.
● Massey, Gerald. (1900). Gerald Massey Lectures (foreword: John G. Jackson; Introduction: Sibyl Ferguson) (arc) (pdf). Samuel Weiser, 1976; The Book Tree, 2008.
● Massey, Gerald. (1900). Gerald Massey’s Lectures (Amz). Publisher, 1998.
● Massey, Gerald. (1907). Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World: a Work of Reclamation and Restitution in Twelve Books, Volume One. T. Fisher Unwin.
● Massey, Gerald. (1907). Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World: a Work of Reclamation and Restitution in Twelve Books, Volume Two. T. Fisher Unwin.

Works | Other
● Massey, Gerald. (1883). The Historical Jesus and the Mythical Christ: Natural Genesis & Typology of Equinoctial Christolatry (242-pgs) (pdf); originally §13 of Natural Genesis (and or lecture); 45-pg version (Ѻ), Secular Society Limited by the Pioneer Press, 1900; Publisher, 1992.

External links
Gerald Massey – Wikipedia.
Nile Genesis – Gerald-Massey.org.uk.

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