Giovanni Aleotti

In existographies, Giovanni Aleotti (1546-1636) was an Italian architect, hydraulics engineer, cartographer, geometer, and translator, noted for []

Overview
In 1589, Aleotti, amid a period of forced inactivity due to illness, devoted himself to study studies and to an Italian translation and printed edition of Federico Commandino’s 1575 Latin translation of Hero’s 50AD Pneumatica. [1]

Quotes | On
The following are quotes on Aleotti:

“Annexed to Aleotti’s translation of Heron are four theorems in which he sought to display his own virtuosity. The first three are really re-combinations of elements present in Heron. The fourth theorem, however, reveals something novel. This involved the exploitation of the refrigerative power of compressed air expanding on its release through narrow-gauge tubes. Accordingly, we find Aleotti describing how a room could be kept deliciously cool during the burning days of summer by this means”
— Graham Hollister-Short (2004), “The Formation of Knowledge Concerning Atmospheric Pressure and Steam Power in Europe from Aleotti [1589] to Papin [1690]” [2]

“In explaining how these devices worked Aleotti bases himself, not without some confusion, on Heron's ideas regarding the composition of matter. Nature did not permit a continuous vacuum to exist but Aleotti was somewhat ambivalent about following Heron further in admitting the compressibility of air and its rarefaction. In a manuscript composed about 1615, and examined by Alex Keller some years ago, Aleotti pointed to the phenomena observable when a ramrod was used to compress the charge in a cannon. It was difficult to force down the ramrod when the touch-hole was stopped up because air could not be compressed, and difficult to extract when the ramrod was in the barrel and the touch-hole was then stopped up because the extraction of the ramrod would have begun to create a vacuum. Since Aleotti was unwilling to entertain either the idea of the vacuum or of micro-vacua existing in nature, this meant that Aleotti could not explain why the devices he himself had created were able to work.”
— Graham Hollister-Short (2004), “The Formation of Knowledge Concerning Atmospheric Pressure and Steam Power in Europe from Aleotti [1589] to Papin [1690]” [2]

References
1. (a) Hero. (50AD). The Curious Art of Vapor Movement (The Artificiosi et Curious Spiritual Movements) (translator: Federico Commandino). Publisher, 1575.
(b) Hero. (50AD). Pneumatica (translator: Giovanni Aleotti). Publisher, 1589.
2. Hollister-Short, Graham. (2004). “The Formation of Knowledge Concerning Atmospheric Pressure and Steam Power in Europe from Aleotti [1589] to Papin [1690]” (pg. 146), History of Technology, Volume 25 (editor: Ian Inkster) (§10, pgs. 137-50). Bloomsbury, 2016.

External links
Giovan Battista Aleotti – Wikipedia.
● Giovanni Battista Aleotti (German → English) – Wikipedia.
● Giovan Battista Aleotti (Italian → English) – Wikipedia.

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