God face

God face (Zerotheism for Kids)
An example of a “god face” from slide one (Ѻ) from the 2015 Zerotheism for Kids lecture, wherein kids were taught that god or religion, according to Marquis de Sade (1797), was an opiate for the mind and that “drugs were bad” and that it is better to be a "free thinker" than a "god head" and to search out to get real true happiness rather than artificial happiness, e.g. via god or pharmaceuticals.
In hmolscience, god face refers to the face of someone who is so doped up on god or theological belief, e.g. in the existence of god (or something equivalent), that the feeling it produces is equivalent to taking opium, Prozac, an equivalent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or breathing laughing gas; thereby keeping the person "happy", at least on the surface, producing a fake-smile face, akin a tamed-down version of a black hole sun video (Ѻ), continuously, in public, irrespective of how far one's views, beliefs, and or statements may diverge from reality into the extreme nonsensical range.

Overview
In circa 2010, Libb Thims began to notice a distinguishable difference between those faculty pages of theologians or theologian-minded thinkers, e.g. pretty much everybody listed in the creation scientists ranked by idiocy has the “god face” look in their pictures, e.g. Michael Behe, Kent Hovind, Gordon van Wylen, and William Craig, to new a few:

God faces 2
as though they’re just doped up happy on god, deflecting evidence from their mind as though god was a vertical ping pong table, and the evidence was the pong ball, as compared to more sober-minded thinkers, e.g. Friedrich Nietzsche and Judson Herrick, whose fathers, to note, were pastors, or Henry Mencken, each of whom were willing, to forego theological drug use, to take a stand for truth and reason:

Non-god faces 2
Thims also began to notice the god face on some atheists, e.g. Alexander Rosenberg (2014), who were frank and open about their pharmaceutical happiness formula:

Atheist god face
In 2016, Thims started this "god page" article after first reading about Alan Padgett's 1996 "entropy applies to everything" article, then searching for his faculty page (shown above right), after which all the "god faces" just glared out, to the effective conclusion "oh, he's a god head", or something along these lines.
Alan Padgett (god face)
The faculty profile of Alan Padgett, noted entropy applies to everything (but not god) theorist, showing five "god faces", all doped up on their belief in the existence of god and the happiness and well-being that this feeling produces for them. [2]

Discussion
(add discussion)

Quotes
The following are related quotes:

“Do you, good people, believe that Adam and Eve were created in the Garden of Eden and that they were forbidden to eat from the tree of knowledge? I do. The church has always been afraid of that tree. It still is afraid of knowledge. Some of you say religion makes people happy. So does laughing gas. So does whiskey. I believe in the brain of man.”
Clarence Darrow (c.1925), Scopes Monkey trial commentary

“I prefer the honest jargon of reality to the outright lies of books.”
Jean Rostand (c.1950)

Religion — as noted by Marquis de Sade (1797), Novalis (1798), Marx (1843), and Dirac (1927) — is but an opiate or opium for the mind; and like all drugs, it can be replaced, upgraded, or in some cases treated, with a better or less symptomatic one.”
Libb Thims (2014), personal note, arisen into view, conceptualized as the embodiment of the future day when the physicochemical belief system becomes the new religion for humankind, the term “religion” deriving from the Latin ligare “system which binds”, while attempting to add the 1927 Dirac religion rant to the atheism timeline, and thereby investigating the historical origin of the “religion is a kind of opium” phrase usage by Dirac, at 1:30 PM CST, Sep 17

References
1. (a) Padgett, Alan G. (1996). “The Mutuality of Theology and Science: An Example from Time and Thermodynamics” (pdf), Christian Scholars’ Review (Ѻ), 26:12-35, Fall; in: Science and the Study of God (pg. 113). Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.
(b) Alan G. Padgett (faculty) – Luther Seminary.

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