Hmolpedia citation ranking

In hmolscience, Hmolpedia citation ranking, notation (CR:#), less than 50 internal hyperlinks, or [CR:#], 50 or more internal hyperlinks, as compared to humanities citation ranking (HuCR:#), Aristotle citation ranking (ACR:#), or term rank (TR:#), refers to a ranking of scholars according to the number of times a person Hmolpedia existography is hyperlinked to other articles, with in Hmolpedia.

Citation rankings | 50-citations+
The following is a work-in-progress ranking of all existographies in Hmolpedia that have been internally hyperlinked-cited 50 or more times; the second column shows an individuals IQ and ranking position, if listed in the top 1000 geniuses tables; the CIT column shows the number of internal hyperlinks (citations) of shown individual; the R column shows the number of "references" employed in their existography article; the L colume shows the number of Facebook "like rankings" a given individual has, the seventh column shows eponuyms, and derived terms of individual. [N1]

#

Person
_________________________________________
CIT
RLName / Term -ians


Citations name bar





1.210

1
Goethe | Johann Goethe
→ Johann Goethe (CR:952) [CR:943]
→ Goethe (CR:1168) [CR:1208]
21518139Goethean | Goetheanist
Goetheanism
Goethean philosophy
Goethean revolution
Goethean science (Ѻ)
Goethendipity
Goethe and chemistry
Goethe on free will
Goethe on god
Goethe on good and evil
Goethe on love
Goethe on purpose
Goethe on religion
Goethe on the soul
Goethe’s daimonic
Goethe genealogy
Goethe meets Napoleon
Goethe timeline
Goethe's advertisement
Goethe's affinity table
Goethe's collected works
Goethe's human chemistry
Goethe (pronunciation)
Goethe (quotes)
Goethe-Helmholtz equation

2.205

2
Newton [CR:243] | Isaac Newton [CR:623]86612
Newtonian | Newtonian mechanics
Newtonian government
Newtonian sociology
Newtonianism
Another Newton
Newton’s law of cooling
Newton in Senegal
Newton on god
Newton on religion
Newton on the soul
Social Newton

3.205

5
Gibbs [CR:188] | Willard Gibbs [CR:657] 845552Gibbsian | Gibbsian thermodynamics
Gibbsian reductionism
Gibbsian school
Gibbsianism
Gibbs collected works
Gibbs energy
Gibbs energy flow
Gibbs energy of attraction
Gibbs energy of repulsion
Gibbs entropy
Gibbs equation
Gibbs free energy
Gibbs free energy change
Gibbs fundamental equation
Gibbs governor
Gibbs landscape
Gibbs stamp
Gibbs tombstone
Gibbs and Goethe
Gibbs-Clausius equations

4.195

7
Clausius [CR:126] | Rudolf Clausius [CR:703]8291413Clausius entropy
Clausius inequality
Clausius postulate
Clausius tombstone

5.205

3
Einstein [CR:198] | Albert Einstein [CR:539] 73728
Einstein postulate
Einstein-Pascal dialogue
Einstein’s personal library

6.195

19
Adams [CR:11] | Henry Adams [CR:457]
Brooks Adams
John Adams
Adam Smith (37)
Clover Adams
Adam and Eve
Richard Adams
56835
Adamsian
Adams creed
Adams family tree
Adams memorial
Adams on god

7.195

10
Aristotle | Aristotle53722
Aristotelian
Aristotle on the soul
Aristotle's citation ranking
Aristotle-Mpemba effect

8.180

106
Darwin [CR:181] | Charles Darwin [CR:333]
C.G. Darwin
Erasmus Darwin
51417
Darwinian | Darwinian revolution
Darwinism
Darwin on god
Darwin on religion
Darwin on higher and lower
Darwin-Lotka energy law

9.205

4
Maxwell [CR:24] | James Maxwell [CR:454] 478272Maxwellian | Maxwellian revolution
Maxwell on god
Maxwell on religion
Maxwell on the soul
Maxwell’s demon
Maxwell’s equations
Maxwells relations
Maxwell’s thermodynamic surface
Maxwell’s surface (construction)
Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution

10.195

13
Descartes (143) | Rene Descartes [CR:338] 43121
Cartesian (93) | Cartesian automaton
Cartesian system
Cartesian economics
Cartesian reductionism

11.195

12
Lewis [CR:23] | Gilbert Lewis [CR:406]
C.S. Lewis
Lewis Gordon
Lewis Mumford
Lewis Terman
Lewis Wolpert
429206Lewis dot structure
Lewis chemical bond (Ѻ)
Lewis cubic atoms (Ѻ)
Lewis inequality
Lewis inequality for natural processes
Lewis inequality for unnatural processes
Lewis school of thermodynamics

12.190

25
Carnot (CR:#) | Sadi Carnot
Lazare Carnot
425101Carnotian | Carnotian revolution
Carnot cycle
Carnot engine
Carnot function
Carnot’s principle
Carnot’s theorem

13.170

433
Prigogine | Ilya Prigogine4112228Prigoginean | Prigoginean thermodynamics
Prigogine entropy
Prigogine Medal
Prigogine on god
Prigogine school
Prigogine-Waime theory
Prigogine's disciples

14.195

9
Helmholtz [CR:21] | Hermann Helmholtz [CR:365] 38614
Helmholtz free energy
Helmholtz school

15.185

53
Thomson | William Thomson (219)
James Thomson (41)
James Thomson (mathematician)
38516
Thomson’s search for Carnot’s Reflections

16.190

28
Boltzmann [CR:#] | Ludwig Boltzmann31418
Boltzmann brain problem
Boltzmann chaos assumption
Boltzmann constant
Boltzmann entropy
Boltzmann formula
Boltzmann order-disorder principle
Boltzmann tombstone
Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution

17.185

50
Epicurus | Epicurus35612
Epicurian | Thomas Jefferson
Epicurean swerve
Epicurean atheism
Epicureanism (Ѻ)

18.190

29
Nietzsche | Friedrich Nietzsche32321
Nietzschean
Nietzschean atheism

19.195

16
Voltaire | Voltaire31310
Voltairian (Ѻ)

20.190

38
Ostwald | Wilhelm Ostwald29726
Ostwald happiness formula
Ostwald on the soul

21.185

70
Freud | Sigmund Freud29792Freudian (36)
Freudian psychodynamics
Freudian atheism
Freud on god
Freud on religion
Freud-Schiller drive theory

22.180

98
Plato | Plato294

Platonism (Ѻ)
23.190

36
Democritus | Democritus28511


24.190

20
Pareto | Vilfredo Pareto28238
Partetian | Harvard Paretians
Harvard Pareto circle
Pareto principle
Pareto school
Pareto social pyramid

25.180

87
Lucretius | Lucretius28119
Lucretian
26.190

24
Empedocles | Empedocles27617
Empedoclean
Goethe + Empedocles

27..190

23
Leibniz | Gottfried Leibniz2766
Leibnizian
28.195

11
Galileo (CR:116) | Galileo Galilei (CR:157)27314
Galilean reference frame
Galileo engine

29.185

60
Schopenhauer | Arthur Schopenhauer25020
Schopenhauerian [4]
Schopenhauerian atheism
Schopenhauer’s porcupines

30.190

42
Planck | Max Planck24713
Planck constant
Planck length
Planck on religion


190

26
Schrodinger | Erwin Schrodinger2249
Schrodinger equation
Schrodinger’s cat

3#.190

40
Neumann | Neumann | John Neumann


21929
Neumann automaton theory
Neumann-Shannon anecdote
Neumann notation

31.
Gladyshev | Georgi Gladyshev2134
Gladyshev and Thims
32.180

125
Leucippus | Leucippus2124
Leucippean

180

163
Bergman | Bergman | Torbern Bergman2116
Bergman’s chemical signs explained
Bergman’s affinity table
Bergman’s reaction diagrams

33.185

75
Kant | Immanuel Kant21017
Kantian | Kantianism
34.180

103
Cicero | Cicero20012


35.180

124
Marx | Karl Marx20411
Marxism
Marxist


200

6
Da Vinci | Leonardo da Vinci19421
Da Vinci engine
Da Vinci on religion

37.185

51
Spinoza | Benedict Spinoza19422
Spinozan
38.175

212
Shannon | Claude Shannon18415
Shannon bandwagon
Shannon entropy
Shannon information

39.190

37
Guericke | Otto Guericke18326
Guericke engine
40.180

138
Rossini | Rossini | Frederick Rossini1757
Rossini debate
Rossini hypothesis

41..185

72
Lotka | Alfred Lotka17422
Lotkean (Dobler, 1997) (Ѻ)
Lotkian (Adams, 1988) (Ѻ)
Lotkean Jabberwocky
Darwin-Lotka energy law

42.180

105
Russell | Bertrand Russell17026
Russellian [3]

180

94
Lavoisier | Antoine Lavoisier166



45.
Moriarty | Philip Moriarty1616
Moriarty-Thims debate
47.185

74
Hobbes | Thomas Hobbes16918
Hobbesian
Hobbist

49.180

121
Teilhard | Pierre Teilhard1536
Teilhardian (Ѻ)
50.190

27
Bacon | Francis Bacon14914
Baconian | Baconian method (Ѻ)
2#.185

57
Boyle | Robert Boyle14811
Boyle-Charles law
Boyle’s law

29.
Hirata | Christopher Hirata1441443



Mimkes | Jurgen Mimkes13910


3#.185

56
Copernicus | Nicolaus Copernicus1366
Copernican system
Copernican revolution

33.
Empedocles | Empedocles13310
Empedoclean
Goethe + Empedocles



Samuelson | Paul Samuelson13221



180

202
Haeckel | Ernst Haeckel12816


34.
Muller | Ingo Muller
Erich Muller
Johannes Muller
Anthonie Muller
128

Muller stability ratio
3#.195

18
Hooke | Robert Hooke12529
Hooke-Boerhaave law
Hooke’s law


180

170
Socrates | Socrates1235


37.
Sidis | William Sidis
Boris Sidis
12387Sidis syndrome (Ѻ)

185

79
Heraclitus | Heraclitus12111
Heraclitean (Ѻ)
Heraclitus vs Parmenides

3#.180

167
Joule | James Joule12010
Joule’s first law
Joule’s second law
Joule on religion

3#.180

126
Parmenides | Parmenides118

Parmenidean (Ѻ)
Heraclitus vs Parmenides

3#.185

46
Bruno | Giordano Bruno118



38.
Hawking | Stephen Hawking1185
Hawking on god
Hawking radiation



Roegen | Nicholas Roegen |
Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen (CR:117)
11711



180

161
Plutarch | Plutarch1167



180

86
Pythagoras | Pythagoras1156


42.
Nernst | Walther Nernst111




190

33
Huygens | Christiaan Huygens11010
Huygens engine
44.
Watt | James Watt109

watt (power unit)
Watt governor


45.
Heisenberg | Werner Heisenberg1083
Heisenberg's uncertainty relation
Heisenberg-Pauli dialogue


185

69
Mill | John Mill1058


47.
Euler | Leonhard Euler1036
Euler genealogy
Euler reciprocity relation

4#.185

47
Pascal | Blaise Pascal [CR:#] 1028
Pascal atmospheric pressure experiment
Pascal's wager (CR:13)
Einstein-Pascal dialogue

48.
Mirowski | Philip Mirowski101



49.
Hooke | Robert Hooke12522
Hooke’s law

180

93
Sherrington | Charles Sherrington12311



185

48
Feynman | Richard Feynman103




180

91
Kepler | Johannes Kepler1009



190

30
Gassendi | Pierre Gassendi996


51.
Winiarski [#4] | Leon Winiarski9835


5#.185

68
Massey | Gerald Massey9710


52.
Laplace | Pierre Laplace96

Laplace’s demon
Napoleon Laplace anecdote

53.180

201
Boerhaave | Herman Boerhaave95

Hooke-Boerhaave law
Boerhaave's law



Beg | Mirza Beg9511
Beg analysis
Beg-Thims dialogue

54.
Papin | Denis Papin95

Papin digester
Papin engine


180

92
Thales | Thales 9414
Thalesian
55.
Tesla | Nikola Tesla947



165

521
Spencer | Herbert Spencer 918
Spencerian dilemma

180

111
Hume | David Hume9012


57.
Wallace | Thomas Wallace89



59.
Samuelson | Paul Samuelson89



60.
Dirac | Paul Dirac86

Dirac dancing anecdote
Dirac on religion

61.
Hoff | Jacobus van't Hoff84

Van’t Hoff equilibrium box
Van’t Hoff school

62.
Schiller | Friedrich Schiller
Ferdinand Schiller
82



63.
Shakespeare | William Shakespeare82




175

252
Herodotus | Herodotus81



64.
Dawkins | Richard Dawkins812
Dawkins number
Dawkins scale

65.
Henderson [#6] | Lawrence Henderson8022


66.
Feynman | Richard Feynman795
Feynman problem solving algorithm
Feynman time capsule wisdom
Feynman on religion
Feynman on god


170

342
Hegel | Georg Hegel794
Hegelianism

180

172
Black | Joseph Black7610



190

44
Poincare | Henri Poincare768
Poincare recurrence theorem

175

235
Paracelsus | Paracelsus727
Paracelsian (Ѻ)
72.
Comte | Auguste Comte72

Comtean | Comtean reductionism


Greenberg | Gary Greenberg716


74.
Young | Thomas Young71





Walrus | Leon Walrus699


75.
Guggenheim | Edward Guggenheim69



76.
Mayer | Robert Mayer
Alfred Mayer
69




180

183
Locke | John Locke694



160

608
Bergson | Henri Bergson678
Bergsonian
77.
Bridgman | Percy Bridgman65

Bridgman formulas
Bridgman paradox

78.
Eddington | Arthur Eddington65



79.
Kauffman | Stuart Kauffman64





Walrus | Leon Walrus639
Walrasian
63.185

63
Hero | Hero6311


80.
Jung | Carl Jung63

Jungian psychodynamics


Hamilton | William Hamilton614
Hamiltonian

180

129
Haber | Fritz Haber6114
Haber process
Haber-Bosch process

82.
Zucker | Morris Zucker61




185

54
Edison | Thomas Edison604
Edison on the soul


Snow | Charles Snow586
Snowed
83.
Sales | Jean Sales58



84.
Soddy | Frederick Soddy58



85.
Napoleon | Napoleon Bonaparte58

Napoleon Laplace anecdote
86.
Faraday | Michael Faraday56



87.
Haber | Fritz Haber57

Haber process
Haber-Bosch process

89.
Lipmann | Fritz Lipmann56





Buss | David Buss56

Buss study
90.
Le Chatelier | Henry Le Chatelier55

Le Chatelier’s principle
91.
Pauling | Linus Pauling54




165

461
Sartre | Jean Sartre 544


93.
Wiener | Norbert Wiener53



94.
Kragh | Helge Kragh 52



95.
Fermi | Enrico Fermi 524
Fermion (compare: Boson)

175

277
Homer | Homer512



145

714
Galton | Francis Galton516




Fisher | Irving Fisher502



180

122
Dostoyevsky | Fyodor Dostoyevsky507
Dostoyevsky dilemma

180

132
Anaxagoras | Anaxagoras5010



175

221
Ptolemy | Claudius Ptolemy501












Thims (CR:124) | Thims | Libb Thims (CR:1963)20871621Thimsian | Thimsian revolution (Ѻ)
Thimsianism
Thimsian philosophy
Thimsian thermodynamics


(add)
Gibbs and Goethe 2
The big three hmolscience giants are: Goethe, Gibbs, and Clausius. The 2006 Walk of Ideas book stack sculpture shows: Grass, Arendt, Heine, Luther, Kant, Seghers, Hegel, Grimm, Marx, Boll, Schiller, Lessing, Hesse, Gontane, Mann, Brecht, and Goethe the big German genius at base, some of which are ranked below.
-
Distillation effect
The work of Goethe, to note, suffers from what is called the "catch up effect", namely, a multi-century delay in respect to the ability of culture to digest what a lightening bolt genius produces or as German scholar Hjalmar Boyesen cogently puts it—the world has not yet caught up to him:

“It is difficult to overestimate the value of Goethe’s work to humanity. The bequest which he left to the world in his writings, and in the whole intellectual result of his life, is not as yet appreciated at its full worth; because, intellectually, the world has not yet caught up to him. His influence today asserts itself in a hundred minute ways—even where no one suspects it. The century has received the stamp and impress of his mighty personality. The intellectual currents of the age, swelled and amplified by later tributaries, flow today in the directions which Goethe indicated.”
Hjalmar Boyesen (1885),The Life of Goethe

This especially so with Goethe's self-declared "best book" book masterpiece, his physical chemistry based Elective Affinities.

Gibbs + Goethe | Independent connections
The connection between Gibbs and Goethe has only been discerned, independently, by three people, amid the known 500+ HT pioneers, two of which are chemical engineers and all three of which are chemical thermodynamicists and or historians of chemical thermodynamics (Garrison):

Fielding Garrison (1910) — American chemical thermodynamics historian
Tominaga Keii (2004) — Japanese chemical engineer
Libb Thims (2006) — American electrochemical engineer

The same can be said in respect to Clausius, to a good extent, but Gibbs, so to say, "caught up" to Clausius rather quickly. The bulk of the hard science world still has not fully caught up to Gibbs, which is evidence by the fact that only a handful of people have ever cogently been able to advance on his geometrical-graphical thermodynamics work, including:James Maxwell, Ronald Kriz, and about two others, as discussed by Kriz. Alternatively, as summarized mathematical physicist Arthur Wightman (1979), even though Gibbs's graphical formulation of the laws of thermodynamics had been immediately embraced by Maxwell, Gibbs' graphical formulation only came into widespread use in the mid 20th century, thanks to the work of László Tisza and Herbert Callen. [1]

This is strikingly evidenced in the humanities and the social sciences, wherein a very prolonged and tortuous trickle-down effect seems to be at works, in how the "distillation" and passing down of knowledge through the hard sciences to the soft sciences goes through a sort of power source chain of command—as is aptly evidenced by the current humanities citation rankings—wherein the catching up to Goethe is so acutely pronounced, which can be attributed to a number of factors, firstly that chemical thermodynamics and in particular chemical engineering thermodynamics are subjects common only to chemical engineers and physical chemists to some extant, among a few other fields to a lesser degree of understanding, and secondly to the last universal genius effect, namely that with the passing of the decade of the reaction end of John Neumann (1903-1957) (IQ=190), a polymath able to simultaneously grasp both spectrums of the two cultures, the knowledge fanning affect has taken strong root, effectively pigeonholing the erudite class into divided subject spheres.

Quotes
The following is an example of mononym usage in Hmolpedia:

“The work of Clausius lies not on the shelves of libraries, but in the thoughts of men, and in the history of more than one science.”
Willard Gibbs (1889), Publication
“The Constitution was founded on the law of gravitation. The government was to exist and move by virtue of the efficacy of ‘checks and balances.’ The trouble with the theory is that government is not a machine, but a living thing. It falls, not under the theory of the universe, but under the theory of organic life. It is accountable to Darwin, not to Newton. It is modified by its environment, necessitated by its tasks, shaped by the sheer pressure of life.”
Woodrow Wilson (1912), Presidential candidate campaign speech [2]

Notes
N1. (a) Note: those CR numbers shown in square brackets [#] are current "direct link" based CRs, based on the "rename this page" tool, which shows exactly how many pages are linked. The curved brackets (#) are from the old CR method, wherein numbers were obtained by the return # of the search box (which is no longer operational and or coded the same way as before). Or, if someone had many things named after them, the methods show a distinct difference, e.g. Willard Gibbs (1023), via the old method, vs Willard Gibbs [845], vis the new "direct link" method (2 Apr 2020).
(b) Some existographies that were renamed, e.g. Galileo Galilei to "Galileo", lost citation count to the previous name, therein skewing the ranked position downward for such individuals.

See also
Another Newton
Buzan IQ
Cattell 1000
Cox IQ
Cox-Buzan IQ
Genius IQs
Genius IQ candidates
Greatest chemist ever
Greatest engineer ever
Greatest mathematician ever
Greatest literary author ever
Greatest philosopher ever
Greatest physicist ever
Greatest thermodynamicist ever
Guinness Book IQ
Humanities citation ranking
IQ: 150+ | Smartest woman ever
IQ: 200+
IQ: 225+


References
1. (a) Wightman, Arthur. (1979). "Convexity and the notion of equilibrium state in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics" (pp. xiii, lxx). Published as an introduction to R. B. Israel, Convexity in the Theory of Lattice Gases (pgs. ix–lxxxv). Princeton University Press, 1979),
(b) Arthur Whiteman – Wikipedia.
2. (a) Wilson, Woodrow. (1912). “What is Progress?”, Campaign speech; in:The New Freedom(§2). Publisher, 1913.
(b) Connelly, William F. (2010). James Madison Rules America: the Constitutional Originals of Congressional Partisanship (§:Wilson versus Madison: The Separation of Powers, pgs. 119-). Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
3. Palmer, Michael. (2013). Atheism for Beginners: a Coursebook for Schools and Colleges (§:Bertrand Russell, pgs. 209-10; atheist A.J. Ayer a notable "Russellian", pg. 209) . Lutterworth Press.
4. Malieth, Monydit (aka Tonnerre). (2013).The Future Affects the Past: What Destination is Time Rushing To? (pg. 54). Red Lead Books.

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