Irving Klotz

Irving Klotz nsIn thermodynamics, Irving M. Klotz (1916-2005) was an American professor of chemistry and biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology, notable, in chemical thermodynamics, for the publication of his 1950 textbook Chemical Thermodynamics: Basic Theory and Methods, one of the first teaching books on the subject of chemical thermodynamics, and for his later work in energy theory applied to what he referred to as "biochemical reactions". [1]

In following editions of the textbook, which is still in use, Klotz began to co-author with Robert M. Rosenberg. [2] Klotz received his bachelor’s degree in 1937 and completed a PhD in 1940, both from the University of Chicago, after which time he joined the faculty of Northwestern University, in Evanston, IL, where he guided the development of the application of thermodynamics into the biological sciences, particularly in the area of ligand-receptor energetics. [3]

References
1. Klotz, Irving M. (1950). Chemical Thermodynamics: Basic Theory and Methods, New York: Prentice-Hall, Inc.
2. Klotz, Irving M. and Rosenberg, Robert M. (2008). Thermodynamics – Basic Theory and Methods, (7th ed). Wiley-Interscience.
3. Staff writer. (2005). “Irving M. Klotz Dies at Age 89”, Northwestern News, May 03.

Further reading
● Klotz, Irving. (1957). Some Principles of Energetics in Biochemical Reactions. Academic Press.
● Klotz, Irving. (1967). Energy Changes in Biochemical Reactions. Academic Press.
● Klotz, Irving. (1986). Introduction to Biomolecular Energetics: Including Ligand-Receptor Interactions. Elsevier.
● Klotz, Irving M. (1997). Ligand-Receptor Energetics. Wiley.

● Koltz, Irving M. (2001). “Thermodynamic Concepts: Evolution and Application”, in: Drug-Receptor Thermodynamics (editor: Robert Raffa) (§3, pgs. 31-54). Wiley.
● Koltz, Irving M. (2001). “Effector-Receptor Interactions: Origin and Development of Energetic Perspectives”, in: Drug-Receptor Thermodynamics (editor: Robert Raffa) (§7, pgs. 105-125). Wiley.

External links
Symposium Honors Irving Klotz, Northwestern University.

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