Jesus crucified between two thieves

Jesus crucified between two thieves
A gist synopsis of the origin behind the myth of Jesus being crucified on a "cross" between "two thieves", which amounts to a Roman recension rescript of the older Egyptian astro-theology models and stories of how the sun seemingly lose its power, or has its light "stolen" daily and annually, which, in story form, was said to (a) result from the nightly battle of the sun god with the darkness (e.g. the god Set), above left, Ra-Osiris (or Osiris-Ra) holding two was scepters; or (b) for the sun to have its light stolen from the moon, or two baboon gods Aan (Ѻ), symbolic and or sacred to the moon good Thoth, above center (below right of the falcon god Horus; Anubis shown below left); or (c) a syncretism of both Osiris and Horus myths, in the Osiris-Horus god morph.
In religio-mythology, Jesus crucified between two thieves refers to Roman recension rescript of an ancient pre-Christianity astro-mythology motif of the sun being reborn, on a cross, where the sun god, in question, refers either to Horus, as the morning sun, reborn at the vernal equinox, in the zodiac between the constellation gods Anubis (aka John the Baptist) and Aan (Ѻ) the baboon form of the moon god Thoth; Osiris-Ra, symbolic of light and justice, being reborn, in the form of the ankh, gripping two was scepters, representative of the darkness god Set, symbolic of darkness, evil, or injustice; or a later Roman rescript syncretism of both, in the form of joint monotheistic-stylized god Osiris-Horus, the forerunner to Jesus Christ.

Overview
In 1250BC, Egyptian scribes, in the Papyrus of Ani (Ѻ), depicted six baboons, shown below, symbolized by the god constellation Aan, as shown at the vernal equinox, in the Dendera Temple zodiac (75BC), above (middle), greeting the morning sun, shown in the form of the Ankh, above (left), being born out of Djed pillar or backbone of Osiris (aka Christmas tree):

Aan (baboon)

The Anubis zodiac symbol, shown in the Dendera Temple zodiac, at vernal equinox, top image (middle), is symbolic of the start of the annual Nile River flood, prior to the sun being reborn, aka baptism or John the Baptist in the Roman recension of Christianity.

Quotes
The following are related quotes:

“Two other lunar types were Anup [Anubis], the jackal, and Aan (Ѻ), the dog-headed ape. These two may be seen figured back to back at the place of the vernal equinox in the zodiac of Dendera. Each of the two had represented the dark half of the lunation (the one with Horus, the other with That [Thoth]) in two different stages of the mythos; each had been the thief of the light; the Mercury who was the thief personified. In these two thieves at the crossing we may perhaps identify the two thieves at the cross, as Mows, the solar lord of light in the moon—in the form of his hawk—is placed between or just over these two thieves at the crossing, the station of the cross! The birthplace of the god who was reborn or who rose again at the Vernal equinox is shown by the constellation of the Thigh or Uterus. Anup on one side of Horus, and Aan on the other, are the two thieves on either hand of the Kamite [Egyptian] Christ upon the cross at Easter.”
Gerald Massey (c.1890), “Historical Jesus, Mythical Christ” [2]

“In these two thieves at the crossing we may see the original of the two thieves on the cross, as horns, the solar lord of light in the moon — in the form of his hawk — is placed between or just over these two thieves at the crossing, the station of the cross! The birthplace of the god who was reborn, or who rose again at the Vernal Equinox, is shown by the constellation of the Thigh or Uterus. Anup [Anubis] on one side of horns and Aan on the other are the two thieves on either side of the Egyptian Christ upon the cross at Easter.”
— Robert Shaw (1904), Sketch of the Religions of the World (pg. 296)

Brugsch [c.1888] has suggested that this ape is a form of Thoth as the god of ‘equilibrium’, and that it elsewhere symbolizes the equinoxes.”
— George Mead (1906), Thrice-Great Hermes (pgs. 55-56)

“The jackal of Anup and the cynocephalus of Taht-Aan, which figured as types of the dark lunation, were conceived as having stolen the light from the bright moon. As the dark period before and after the illumination, they stood on either side of the Christ light on the moon. They were dubbed ‘thieves of the light’, in contrast to the twelve solar characters who were guardians of the treasure of light. Hermes, cognate with Anup, was in Greek mythology the thief. In the zodiac of Dendera just where Horus is shown on the cross or at the crossing of the vernal equinox, these two thieves Anup and Aan are drawn on either side of the sun god. Here would appear to be the authentic pre-Christian prototype of the Gospel crucifixion between two thieves.”
Alvin Kuhn (1940), Lost Light: an Interpretation of Ancient Scriptures (pg. 528)

“At the round zodiac at the Temple of Dendera, the perpendicular line to the temple axis runs through Horus between the two thieves’ (Anubis and Aan) and represents the vernal equinox around 100 BCE.”
Rene Lubicz (c.1950), Sacred Science: the King of Pharaonic Theocracy (pg. 178); cited by Dorothy Murdock (2009) in Christ in Egypt (pg. 375) [1]

“Both Osiris and Horus, depending on the hours, would be the ‘crucified’ sun, as the sun crossing the sky, between the two thieves of sunset and sunrise.”
Dorothy Murdock (2009), Christ in Egypt (pg. 362)

References
1. Dorothy, Murdock. (2009). Christ in Egypt (pgs. 363, 375). Publisher.
2. (a) Massey, Gerald. (c.1890). “The Historical Jesus and the Mythical Christ”, Lecture; in: Gerald Massey Lectures (foreword: John G. Jackson; Introduction: Sibyl Ferguson) (pdf). Samuel Weiser, 1976.
(b) Massey, Gerald. (1900). Gerald Massey Lectures (§1:1-26; quote, pgs. 117-18) (arc). The Book Tree, 2008.
(c) Maxwell, Jordan; Tice, Paul; Snow, Alan. (2000). That Old-Time Religion: the Story of Religious Foundations (§: Astro-Theology: The Historical Jesus and the Mythical Christ, pgs. 5-24; §:The Solar Cult, pgs. 35-54). The Book Tree.

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