Laws of information

In science, laws of information are a collection of metaphor types of statements as to supposed properties of information, modeled generally on the laws of thermodynamics.

Overview
In 1985, American educator Dick Hammond, in the context of evolution of life, information theory, and thermodynamics, gave four information laws: [1]

First law of information: Information, genetic or learned, exists in the arrangement of matter.
Second law of information: Information, genetic or learned, regulates time, organizes matter, and controls energy flow.
Third law of information: Information, genetic or learned, is inversely related to entropy.
Fourth law of information: Information, genetic or learned, is created and destroyed.

Hammond later (2005) declared:
“what has been discovered are a new set of laws which necessarily evolved for life to cope with the laws of thermodynamics.”

In 1998,
American intelligent design advocate William Dembski proposed a aw of conservation of information.

In circa 1999, Italian philosopher Luciano Floridi proposed four principles of information ethics: [2]

0. Information entropy ought not to be caused in the infosphere.
1. Information entropy ought to be prevented in the infosphere.
2. Information entropy ought to be removed from the infosphere.
3. The flourishing of information entities as well as of the whole infosphere ought to be promoted by preserving, cultivating and enriching their properties.

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Difficulties
All of the various laws of information are baseless; give or take, for the most part.

References
1. Hammond, Dick E. (2005). Human System from Entropy to Ethics (pgs. 105-08). Publisher: Dick Hammond.
2. Medina, Tom and Britz, Johannes J. (2004). Information Ethics in the Electronic Age: Current Issues in Africa and the World (pg. 151). McFarland.

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