Lewis inequality for an unnatural process

Lewis inequality for an unnatural process
Summary the Lewis inequality for an unnatural process according to standard 1933 definition of English chemical thermodynamicist Edward Guggenheim. [1]
In inequalities, the Lewis inequality for an unnatural process is: [1]

 dG > 0 \,

for a differential change in the system, or:

 \Delta G > 0 \,

for a change in the system on going from an initial state to a final state. The Lewis inequality for an "unnatural process", of the two types of Lewis inequalities, is inequality for a non-spontaneous process or reaction. The ‘type’ of systems here being closed isothermal-isobaric systems not harnessed in some way for the production of useful work, which include the common cases of reactions which ‘run freely’, like the combustion of a fuel, the action of an acid upon metal, or a reaction between two people on the surface of the earth. [1]

References
1. Guggenheim, Edward, A. (1933). Modern Thermodynamics by the Methods of Willard Gibbs (pg. 17). London: Methuen & Co.
2. Lewis, Gilbert N. and Randall, Merle. (1923). Thermodynamics and the Free Energy of Chemical Substances (pgs. 160-61). McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc.

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