Louis de Broglie

Louis de BroglieIn existographies, Louis de Broglie (1892-1987) (IQ:180|#194) [GPE] (CR:21) was a French physicist, noted for his 1924 proof that any kind of particle, whether atom, electron, photon, or even a bullet or a planet must have associated with it a wave, which is not material, but whose strength tells the probability of its presence

Overview
In 1924, de Broglie gave a proof that any kind of particle, whether atom, electron, photon, or even a bullet or a planet must have associated with it a wave, which is not material, but whose strength tells the probability of its presence, whose wavelength is: [1]

de Broglie wavelength

where h is Planck’s constant and p its initial momentum. De Broglie, in retrospect, summarizes the origin of his wave mechanics as follows: [3]

“I presented the first principles of wave mechanics in three Notes that appeared in Comptes rendus of Septempber-October 1923 and later gave a more elaborate version in my Doctoral Thesis submitted on 25th of November, 1924. My essential idea was to generalize for all particles the coexistence of waves and particles which had been discovered by Einstein in 1905 for the case of light and photons. In conformity with the clear ideas of classical physics, I tried to imagine a real physical wave which transported minute and localized objects through space in the course of time.”

De Broglie then goes on to explain the two ways he went about doing this.

The Heisenberg uncertainty relation, supposedly, is derived or rather a necessary consequence of the above de Broglie wavelength equation. [2]

Quotes | By
The following are quotes by Broglie:

“In classical thermodynamics, we introduce in order to enunciate the second principle of this science the magnitude ‘entropy’, the physical meaning of which remained so obscure that Henri Poincare called it ‘prodigiously abstract’.”
— Louis de Broglie (1979), “Article” [4]

“It was Boltzmann who, by developing the ideas of statistical thermodynamics, gave us the real meaning of this quantity by showing that the entropy S of the state of a body is connected to to the probability P of this state by the famous formula: S = kB ln P [...] in Analytical Mechanics [...] the real meaning of Hamilton’s principle is the following: The movement of a body is that which has the greatest thermodynamic probability under the conditions to which is subjected. I think that this conception of the deep nature of the Hamiltonian principle casts a stream of light upon real meaning, analogous to that which Boltzmann's formula casts on the meaning of entropy.”
— Louis de Broglie (1979), “Article” [4]

See also
Human wave function

References
1. De Broglie, Louis. (1924). Research on the Theory of the Quanta (Recherches sur la théorie des quanta), PhD theses presentees a la Faculte des Sciences de iUniversite de Paris (Masson, Paris, 1924); in: Annales de Physique 3, 22 (1925);
2. Compton, Arthur H. (1935). The Freedom of Man (pg. 35). Yale University Press.
3. De Broglie, Louis. (1973). “On the True Ideas of Underlying Wave Mechanics” (original in French), C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Series B, 277, Jul 16; in: Old and New Questions in Physics, Cosmology, Philosophy, and Theoretical Biology: Essays in Honor of Wolfgang Yourgrau (editor: Alwyn Merwe; translators: J.-P. Marchand and A. van der Merwe) (§6:83-86). Plenum Press, 1983.
4. (a) Broglie, Louis de. (1979). “Article”, Kinam (Mexico), 1:93.
(b) Luzzi, Roberto. (2004). “Entropy: Mystery and Controversy: Plethora of Informational-Entropies and Unconventional Statistics” (coauthors: Aurea Vasconcellows and Galvao Ramos) (pdf), ArXiv, Jan 13.

External links
Louis de Broglie – Wikipedia.

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