Lucilius

In existographies, Gaius Lucilius (c.180-102BC) (IQ:165|#350) , oft-cited as “Lucilius” (Varro, c.50BC) was a Roman philosopher and satirist, influential to Cicero, among others, noted for []

Life is force
In 120BC, Lucius, as cited by Marcus Varro (c.50BC), stated the following logic: [1]

Life is force you see: to do everything force doth compel us.”

Or, in the Latin original:

“Vis est vita vides? Vis nos facere omnia cogit.”

Here, to clarify, the Latin vis is rendered as "force" and the Latin vita is rendered as "life". Vita and Mor, however, to note, are the Greco-Roman gods of life and death, respectively.

Force performs work whenever a body moves (labeled)
A diagram illustrating the immense confusion that arises when the standard Newtonian-based physics definition of the fact that a "force performs work whenever a body moves" (Clausius, 1875) is moved from focus on body B to body A, wherein ancient religio-mythology-based ideas about: free will, soul, self-motion,god’s will (see: Mirza Beg), force of god, living force (higher power, living energy, choice, etc.), and so on come to the fore; whereas these anthropomorphic-ingrained beliefs are of no concern when the focus is on body B.
Discussion
See also: Library walk problem
In Lucius' life is force, i.e. that which the force compels us to do, here we see something akin to the colloquial Jedi philosophy, e.g. the "use the force" motto.

In the post Newtonian-Clausiusian conception of things, we are typically taught that when body A, as diagrammed adjacent, applies a force F1 of X newtons to body B, which thus overcomes the force Y newtons of friction, and the thereby accordingly body B moves some distance D, that an amount of work W is done. Therefore, force performs work whenever a body moves. This, of course, is all standard modern textbook physics.

When, however, the focus is put on body A, and the question is asked what force F2 [?] moves body A to perform work W, the question becomes fixated and puzzled, clogged up in ancient religio-mythology-based ideas about: free will, soul, self-motion, god’s will (see: Mirza Beg), force of god, living force (higher power, living energy, choice, etc.), and so on come to the fore; whereas these anthropomorphic-ingrained beliefs are of no concern when the focus is on body B.

Quotes | On
The following are quotes on Lucius:

“The poets, through the conjunction of fire and moisture, are indicating that the vis, ‘force’, which they have is that of Venus [Aphrodite]. Those born of vis have what is called vita, ‘life’, and that is what is meant by Lucilius [c.120BC] when he says: ‘life is force you see: to do everything force doth compel us’.”
Marcus Varro (c.50BC), On the Latin Language [1]

References
1. (a) Varro, Marcus. (c.50BC). On the Latin Language: On the Science and the Origin of Words, Addressed to Cicero, Volume One, Volume Two (editor: G.P. Goold). Harvard University Press, 1938.
(b) Fisher, Jay. (2014). The Annals of Quintus Ennius and the Italic Tradition (vis est vita, pg. 152). JHT Press.
(c) Venus – Wikipedia
(d) Aphrodite – Wikipedia.
(e) Lucretius. (55BC). De Rerum Natura Libri Sex: Explanatory Notes (vis est vita, pg. 15) (editor: Hugh Munro (Ѻ)). Deighton Bell, 1886.
(f) Ennius – Wikipedia.
(g) John “Jay” Fisher (faculty) – Branford College.

External links
Gaius Lucilius – Wikipedia.

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