Mathematical sociology

Introduction to Mathematical Sociology (2012)
Phillip Bonacich and Philip Lu's 2012 Introduction to Mathematical Sociology, wherein they present standard topics, such as: weak ties, prisoner’s dilemma, chaos, complexity, and small world networks. [3]
In science, mathematical sociology is the study of way in which mathematics can be utilized in sociology.

History
In 1964, American chemical engineer turned sociologist James Coleman published his Introduction to Mathematical Sociology, wherein he applies some cursory chemistry, physics, and thermodynamics models to the study of social phenomena. [1]

In 1996, Joshua Epstein and Robert Axtell published their Growing Artificial Societies, based on artificial life stylized computer simulations, which has some mathematical sociology citations. [4]

In 2012, Phillip Bonacich and Philip Lu published Introduction to Mathematical Sociology, wherein they present standard topics, such as: weak ties, prisoner’s dilemma, chaos, complexity, small world networks, among a few others. [3]

In 2014, Richard Kilburg and Marc Donohue, in their “Leadership and Organization Behavior: a Thermodynamic Inquiry”, attempt to platform off mathematical sociology, by stating that the field exists and uses statistical concepts similar to those of chemistry and molecular physics, via citation to Coleman (1964), Epstein and Axtell (1996), and Bonacich and Lu (2012). [2]

See also
Mathematical economics
Mathematical thermodynamics

References
1. Coleman, James S. (1964). Introduction of Mathematical Sociology (chemistry, 8+ pgs; thermodynamics, 7+ pgs; physics, 11+ pgs; entropy, pgs. 87, 441-42). The Free Press.
2. Kilburg, Richard R and Donohue, Marc D. (2014). “Leadership and Organization Behavior: a Thermodynamic Inquiry”, Consulting Psychological Journal: Practice and Research, Special Issue: the Physics of Leadership and Organizational Structure (abs) (main), 66(4):261-87.
3. Bonacich, Phillip and Lu, Philip. (2012). Introduction to Mathematical Sociology. Princeton University Press.
4. Epstein, Joshua M. and Axtell, Robert L. (1996). Growing Artificial Societies: Social Science From the Bottom Up. MIT Press.

External links
Mathematical sociology – Wikipedia.

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