Michael McCullough

In existographies, Michael McCullough (c.1946-) is an American political scientist, noted for his 1977 to present efforts to outline ideas on political thermodynamics, as an upgrade above military dictatorship rule, particularly through the Fritjof Capra’s 1996 Web of Life formulation of Ilya Prigogine’s far-from-equilibrium model of order “self-organizing” or arising from chaos.

Overview
In 1977, McCullough, in his “Teilhard and the Information Revolution”, speculated about “the possible future development of a science of political thermodynamics”, an idea which grew directly out of his experience of residing for three years under a military dictatorship in Brazil, where he went with the Peace Corps following my 1968 graduation. He put this line of thought on the backburners for many years but revived it recently with conference presentations like “Democratization and Its Obstruction”, “Grounding Political Science in the Physical World” and “A Complexity Theory of Power”.

Difficulties on theory
The general difficulties on McCullough’s theory, common to most who employ Prigogine logic, is that societies are not plates of silicon oil (or whale oil) heated a hot plate, past a certain Reynold’s number, to form hexagonal shapes (Benard cells), and therefore, according, are not “far-from-equilibrium” things; but rather, correctly, are humans are 26-element things (see: human molecule), reactively heated, in a cyclical manner, which enact Carnot cycles, on a surface made of 92-elements (see: periodic table), going in and out of equilibrium, the dynamics of which governed by equilibrium thermodynamics (e.g. Gates model), not nonequilibrium thermodynamics or Prigoginean thermodynamics. Hence, societies will be modeled as transforming from “initial states” of arrangement or order to “final states” of new arrangement or order; ideas of which loosely seen in: Thomas Schelling’s 1969 checkerboard model of segregation, Richard Delgado’s 1990 “law of racial thermodynamics”, or Ingo Muller’s integration and segregation thermodynamics.

Education
McCullough completed a BA in 1968 at the University of Notre Dame, an AM at Stanford in 1979, and a PhD in political science at City University of New York in 1995. Presently, McCullough is retired from Brooklyn College. [2]

Quote | By
The following are quotes by McCullough:

“We may begin to speculate about a possible future development of a science of political thermodynamics.”
— Michael McCullough (1977), “Teilhard and the Information Revolution” [1]

References
1. (a) McCullough, Michael. (1977), “Teilhard and the Information Revolution”, The Teilhard Review, Feb.
(b) McCullough, Michael. (2020). “American Civil Rights Movement and Speculation about Political Thermodynamics” (Ѻ)(abs), Thermodynamics 2.0 Conference, Jun 23.
2. McCullough, Michael. (2020). “American Civil Rights Movement and Speculation about Political Thermodynamics” (Ѻ)(abs), Thermodynamics 2.0 Conference, Jun 23.

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