Reaction start

Reaction start (Goethe) (24 Apr 2012)
failure to launch
Left: screenshot of the start of the Goethe timeline, on 24 Apr 2012, showing the needed "reaction start" hyperlink, indicating that German polyintellect Johann Goethe, correctly, as an animate molecule (human molecule), was synthesized not "born"; the hyperlink (this page) started on 29 Apr 2013. Right: poster for the 2006 film comedy Failure to Launch, about a "35-year-old man who lives in the home of his parents and shows no interest in leaving the comfortable life his parents", which exemplifies the dual nature of the term "reaction start", being that there is the detaching from the womb point and the detaching from the parental orbital structure point, prior to true reaction start. [2]
In hmolscience, reaction start refers to the point in time in which an animate motile molecular structure, a newly-formed human molecule in particular, detaches from the gestation cavity of its maternal structure—which is to be contrasted and compared to the orbital detachment point, namely the point in time, circa age 15-25, when the "dependent" human molecule (child) detaches from the parental orbital structure, thus becoming an "independent" human molecule (adult). [1]

The term “reaction start” is a chemically-neutral terminology upgrade to the older religio-mythology loaded term “birth”.

See also
Human chemical reaction theory
Reaction existence
Reaction end
Reaction energy
ReactionMatch

References
1. Note: not all human molecules will become "independent", in the sense of becoming a freely-moving unattached human molecule, so to speak, the prime example here being the daughter directly to bride transformation, according to which, namely according to the logic of collision theory, old bonds will be broken and new bonds will form, and the daughter will go directly from one attached structure to another attached structure.
2. Failure to Launch – Wikipedia.

Further reading
● Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume One). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
● Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume Two). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
● Thims, Libb. (2008). The Human Molecule (issuu) (preview) (Google Books) (docstoc). LuLu.


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