Renate Mayntz

Renate MayntzIn existographies, Renate Mayntz (1929-) is a German sociologist, noted for []

Overview
In 1990, Mayntz, in her “The Influence of Natural Science Theories on Contemporary Social Science”, building on cross-over authors such as Ilya Prigogine, Hermann Haken, Humberto Maturana, James Coleman, Rene Thom (Ѻ), Manfred Eigen, Heinz Foerster, Mark Granovetter, Erich Jantsch, Ervin Laszlo, Niklas Luhmann, together with related names, such as Charles Snow, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and Theodor Adorno and their so-called positivism dispute (Ѻ), Herbert Spencer, Karl Deutsch (1963), David Easton (1967), and Talcott Parsons, among others, attempted to summarize the three main conduits or methods by which natural sciences transmit to the social sciences. [1]

Quotes | By
The following are quotes by Mayntz:

“Whether, following C.P. Snow's image of the two cultures, one considers the social sciences to be part of the humanities, or whether with Lepenies (1985) one considers them to be a third category, straddling the fence between natural sciences and humanities, it is evident that the relationship between natural and social sciences has been characterized by ambivalence.”
— Renate Mayntz (1990), “The Influence of Natural Science Theories on Contemporary Social Science” (pg. 5) [1]

References
1. (a) Mayntz, Renate. (1990). “The Influence of Natural Science Theories on Contemporary Social Science” (abs) (pdf). Publisher.
(b) Lepenies, Wolf. (1985). Die drei Kulturen. Soziologie zwischen Literatur und Wissenshaft. Munchen: Hanser.

External links
Renate Mayntz – Wikipedia.
Renate Mayntz (research) – MPG.de.

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