Romanticism

Romanticism and the Sciences (1990)
English Goethean scholar Jeremy Adler’s 1990 “Goethe’s Use of Chemical Theory in his Elective Affinities” is found in the collaborative book Romanticism and the Sciences. [3]
In science, romanticism is the a view that rejects rationalism in favor of feelings, individual experience, and passion; in some forms, it supported a variant of spiritualism that was a challenge to traditional religion. [1]

Overview
The ‘romantic movement’, supposedly, referred to a totality of experience movement alternative to the rationalist Newtonian mechanics and Cartesian reductionism.

In 1781, Immanuel Kant, in his Critique of Pure Reason, outlined a view wherein the primacy of mind and will is given predominance; this was said to initiate or seed the romantic movement. [2]

In c.1810s, Friedrich Schlegel (1772-1829), according to Jennifer Hecht (2003), was one who firmed up the idea of "romanticism", called out its members, and promoted it. [1]

References
1. Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 374). HarperOne.
2. Hsieh, Ching-Yao, and Ye, Meng-Hua. (1991). Economics, Philosophy, and Physics (§Romanticism and Philosophy, pgs. 42-). M.E. Sharpe.
3. Adler, Jeremy. (1990). "Goethe's use of chemical theory in his Elective Affinities", in: Romanticism and the Sciences (editors: by Andrew Cunningham and Nicholas Jardine) (§18, pgs. 263-79). Cambridge University Press.

Further reading
● Richards, Robert J. (2002). The Romantic Conception of Life: Science and Philosophy in the Age of Goethe (chemistry, 22+ pgs; physics, 37+). University of Chicago Press.

External links
Romanticism – Wikipedia.
Romanticism in science – Wikipedia.

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