Samuel Coleridge

Samuel Coleridge sIn existographies, Samuel Coleridge (1772-1834) (IQ:175|#267) (Cattell 1000:283) [RGM:448|1,500+] (CR:22) was an English poet-philosopher, initiator of the romantic movement in England, known for his celebrated 1817 coined phrase “suspension of disbelief” (e.g. as cited in Basic Instinct, 1992), and the main antagonist in the 1833 Whewell-Coleridge debate.

Quotes | By
The following are quotes by Coleridge:

“Little do these men know what atheism is. Not one man in a thousand has either enough strength of mind or goodness of heart to be an atheist. I repeat it. Not one man in a thousand has either enough strength of mind or goodness of heart to be an atheist. And were I not a Christian, and that only in the sense in which I am a Christian, I should be an atheist with Spinoza; rejecting all in which I found insuperable difficulties, and resting my only hope in the gradual—and certain, because of gradual, progression of the species.”
— Samuel Coleridge (1820), Publication; cited by Charles Southwell (1843) in The Oracle of Reason (pg. 420) [1]

References
1. (a) Coleridge, Samuel. (1820). Publication (Ѻ). Publisher.
(b) Southwell, Charles. (1843). The Oracle of Reason: Philosophy Vindicated, Volume Two (Coleridge, pg. 420). T. Paterson.
(c) Cardiff, Ira. (1945). What Great Men Think of Religion (atheist, 24+ pgs; Coleridge, pg. 72). Christopher Publishing House.

External links
Samuel Taylor Coleridge – Wikipedia.

TDics icon ns

More pages