Siger of Brabant

Siger of BrabantIn existographies, Siger of Brabant (c.1240-1284) (IQ:#|#) was a Belgian-born (Ѻ) French-Latin philosopher, aka the “Latin Averroes”, noted for his secular interpretation (Ѻ) of Aristotle; in his Impossibilia, presented the idea that “there is no god” (see: god does not exist), intended an intellectual training tool for students in logical disputation; the Condemnation of 1277 was, supposedly, a response to radical thinkers, such as Brabant; Dante, in the Divine Comedy, put Siger in the ‘Heaven of Light’ in the brilliant company of twelve illustrious souls, specifically beside Thomas Aquinas and Isidore of Seville.

Overview
In c.1275, Siger, in his Impossibilia, presented the idea that “there is no god” (see: god does not exist), intended an intellectual training tool for students in logical disputation. [1]

In Paris, Siger taught that the individual soul had no immortality, and that the world was eternal rather than created. [2]

Siger, per reason of his full acceptance of Averroism (see: Averroes), did battle with Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas.

Dante
Dante, in the Divine Comedy, put Siger in the ‘Heaven of Light’ in the brilliant company of twelve illustrious souls, specifically beside Thomas Aquinas and Isidore of Seville.

Quotes | By
The following are representative quotes:

“For not every being has a cause of its being, nor does every question about being have a cause. For if it is asked why there is something in the natural world rather than nothing, speaking about the world of created things, it can be replied that there is a first immoveable mover, and a first unchangeable cause. But if it is asked about the whole universe of beings why there is something there rather than nothing, it is not possible to give a cause, for it's the same to ask this as to ask why there is a god or not, and this does not have a cause. Hence, not every question has a cause, nor even every being.”
— Siger of Brabant (c.1275), Publication (Ѻ)

References
1. Weltecke, Dorothea. (2013). “The Medieval Period”, in: The Oxford Handbook of Atheism (editors: Stephen Bullivant and Michael Ruse) (pg. 172). Oxford University Press.
2. Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (pg. 257). HarperOne.

External links
Siger of Brabant – Wikipedia.

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