Social enthalpy

Social enthalpy (snippet)
A snippet of section from Rudolf Starkermann's 1986 definition of social exergy, social enthalpy, and social entropy; along with a partial section on how the speed of exchanged information, supposedly, purportedly between the members of a society, is analogous to some type of temperature (or social temperature?). [1]
In hmolscience, social enthalpy refers to the equivalent of enthalpy within a society or between members of a society.

Starkermann
The first to use the term “social enthalpy” was German-born Canadian mechanical engineer Rudolf Starkermann, in his “Social Entropy, Enthalpy, Exergy in Psychosocial Systems: a Notion”, address, given at the 1986 International Conference on Mental Images, Values, and Reality, listed social enthalpy in the following key term format: [1]

“HC = social enthalpy, the total information package of a social ° unit (individual) , which includes the speed of association of thoughts, the speed of action and the will power a) to reach its own goal and b) to communicate. H can differ from individual to individual.”

As the term “social enthalpy” is a very advanced term in human thermodynamics, one that generally is considered to involve "heat content" and changes to bond energies of the molecules of the system, involving two quantitative parts: social internal energy and social pressure-volume work, arrived at after all the other social energy, social entropy, social temperature, etc., terms have been exhausted and played with, this would explain why Starkermann’s article is not cited by anyone, according to Google Scholar (Ѻ), himself (1988) aside—namely, because it is a very deep and more difficult connection to make, connecting enthalpy to society. .

Another ripe passage from the conference, is the following: [1]

Le Chatelier's principle (systems theory)

showing, possibly Starkermann, attempting to formulate an organization management theory, employing: Ross Ashby's theories on adaption, equifinality, autopoieses, and Le Chatelier's principle. Somehow, as shown adjacent, we see with Starkermann's discussions of "information packet", "exchanged information", etc., would seem to be mixed up with Claude Shannon, in some way or another, and information theory, who is cited in the conference.

In 1988, Starkermann, in his “Social Entropy, Enthalpy, Exergy and Disergy in Examples”, gives the following abstract: [2]

“For the thermodynamic terms entropy, enthalpy and exergy, parallel terms for the psychosocial area of communication are illustrated. The thermodynamic notion energy is paralleled by dynamic information, the molecule by a goal-oriented social individual, exergy by the maximum goal attainment of the individuals who constitute a communication system, enthalpy by the will of action and the associated activity, and entropy by the density of communication, the amount of information exchanged and the classification of communication (as devotional, aggressive or destructive). The absolute temperature in thermodynamics is paralleled by the speed with which information is exchanged. The term disergy (distracting energy) is added and illustrated in cases where the communication system is open to outside environment.”

Much of this basis of logic, it seems, resulted in Starkermann’s 2003 three-part Amity and Enmity: Two Archetypes of Social Existence: an Interdisciplinary Study. [3]

Rossini
In 1971, American chemical thermodynamicist Frederick Rossini, in his "Chemical Thermodynamics in the Real World" Priestly Medal address, presented a description of enthalpy in society as being the measure of "security" as contrasted to "entropy" which he equates to the measure of freedom. [3]

Other
In 2013, German effectiveness coach Deb Preuss tweeted the following: (Ѻ)

“Looking for a word. Describes a property of a person who promotes social enthalpy. Sounds weird, but it's a great word, and I've lost it!”

It is difficult to envision what Preuss is after here, aside from some type of thermal word, such as warmhearted.

See also
Applied human thermodynamics
Human molecular engineering
Human engineering thermodynamics
Social atom
Social chemistry
Social combustion theory
Social energy
Social energetics
Social entropy
Social entropy theory
Social free energy
Social ideal gas law
Social mechanism
Social mechanics
Social molecule
Social Newton
Social physics
Social physics school
Social piston and cylinder
Social system
Social thermodynamics

References
1. (a) Starkermann, Rudolf. (1986). “Social Entropy, Enthalpy, Exergy in Psychosocial Systems: a Notion”, (pg. #; Le Chatelier's principle, Ѻ), in: Proceedings of the International Conference on Mental Images, Values, and Reality, Volume 2 (pgs. 17-26), Intersystems Publishing.
(b) Starkermann, Rudolf – WorldCat Identities.
(c) Rudolf Starkermann (works) – Starkermann.com.
2. Starkermann, Rudolf. (1988). “Social Entropy, Enthalpy, Exergy and Disergy in Examples” (abs), Mathematical and Computer Modelling, 10(6):409-18.
3. (a) Starkermann, Rudolf. (2003). Amity and Enmity: Two Archetypes of Social Existence: an Interdisciplinary Study, Part I (pdf). Zurich: Feedcross.
(b) Starkermann, Rudolf. (2007). Amity and Enmity: Two Archetypes of Social Existence: an Interdisciplinary Study, Part II (pdf). Zurich: Feedcross.
(c) Starkermann, Rudolf. (2007). Amity and Enmity: Two Archetypes of Social Existence: an Interdisciplinary Study, Part II (pdf). Zurich: Feedcross.
4. Rossini, Frederick D. (1971). “Chemical Thermodynamics in the Real World” (abs), Priestley Medal Address, delivered Mar 29 at the national American Chemical Society meeting, Los Angeles, California; in: Chemical Engineering News, April 5, 49 (14): 50-53.

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