Stephen Coleman

photo neededIn hmolscience, Stephen Coleman (1942-) is an American political scientist noted for his 1972 PhD dissertation turned book Measurement and Analysis of Political Systems: a Science of Social Behavior, wherein he rides the Shannon bandwagon to contrive vacuous political theories, admixtured with passing Sokal affair stylized thermodynamic terms mentions, e.g. temperature, state of equilibrium, volume of gas, etc.

Overview
In 1972, Coleman completed his Shannon bandwagon based PhD dissertation turned 1975 book Measurement and Analysis of Political Systems: a Science of Social Behavior, in which he employs the system concept of entropy, which he considers as the state of uncertainty in the system, as the central macroscopic characteristic of social units, albeit mostly based on information theory entropy logic. [1]
Coleman, in 2009, admitted that his concepts have nothing to do with thermodynamics: [5]

“My research doesn’t have anything to do with thermodynamics … the entropy concept is taken from Shannon’s statistical information theory.”

Despite his retrospect denial that his theory has nothing to do with thermodynamics, from his 1975 book we find thermodynamic-soaked gems such as:

“An entropy value for a unitary social system is analogous to a temperature reading for a thermodynamic system, such as a volume of gas. In a state of temperature equilibrium one temperature measurement describes the whole volume of any part of it. If a social system is in an entropy equilibrium, a single entropy measurement describes the state of the system or any subsystem. For a system in partial equilibrium, the entropy values of its subsystems must be known.”

Coleman, in other words, not only rides the Shannon bandwagon, but is running a self-Sokal affair. He goes on to argue for other concepts, such as: election behavior as an entropy indicator, social entropy, political entropy, microscopic entropy measurements, among other conceptions. [4]

In 2007, Coleman published Popular Delusions, giving entropy measurements of conformity, psychological foundations of entropy, and election entropy calculations. [3]

Education
Coleman completed his BA in mathematics, a master’s degree in journalism, and his PhD in 1972 with the dissertation "Measurement and Analysis of Political Systems: a Science of Social Behavior", published as a book in 1975, in political science at the University of Minnesota. [4] He is currently a professor emeritus at the Metropolitan State University.

References
1. (a) Coleman, Stephen. (1975). Measurement and Analysis of Political Systems: a Science of Social Behavior (Omarb. utg. av diss. Minneapolis, 1972). New York: John Wiley & Sons.
(b) Anon. (1977). “Book Reviews: Stephen Coleman, Measure and Analysis of Political Systems” (abs), International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Vol. 18, No. 3-4, 306-307.
2. Coleman, Stephen. (1975). Measurement and Analysis of Political Systems: a Science of Social Behavior (§ : 2-4: Social entropy, pgs 30-35, Entropy (definition): pg. 37; §4-1: Equivalence of social and political entropy, pgs. 82-90; § 7: Entropy Reduction, pgs 146-69) (d) ibid (Appendix II: Microscopic entropy estimation, pgs. 177-85).
3. Coleman, Stephen. (2007). Popular Delusions: How Social Conformity Molds Society and Politics (abs). Cambria Press.
4. University Directory – Metropolitan State University.
5. Coleman, Steven. (2009). "Email to Libb Thims", Feb 5.

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