William Godwin

William GodwinIn existographies, William Godwin (1756-1836) (IQ:155|#521) (Cattell 1000:851) [RGM:733|1,320+] (Murray 4000:N/A) (CR:14) was an English preacher, turned novelist and political philosopher, noted for []

Family
Godwin was husband of philosopher Mary Wollstonecraft (IQ:140±|#591) (Cattell 1000:851) [RGM:528|1,320+] (Stokes 100:75) father of Mary Shelley (wife of Percy Shelley).

Overview
In c.1780, Godwin, while taking a stab at the vocation of ministry, prior to turning to writing as a vocation (1783), one of his parishioners in Stowmarket, Suffolk, gave him key works of the French enlightenment, namely: Baron d’Holbach, Helvetius, and Jean Rousseau, after which this theology dwindled towards deism and his politics turned toward Whig opposition. [1]

In 1793, Godwin, published Political Justice, which is said to be most influenced by the Holbach, Helvetius, and Rousseau, respectively. [2]

Quotes | By
The following are quotes by Godwin:

“He that loves reading has everything within his reach.”
— William Godwin (c.1795)

“Let us not, in the eagerness of our haste to educate, forget all the ends of education.”
— William Godwin (c.1795)

“Next in respect of time to Cornelius Agrippa comes the celebrated Dr. Faustus. Little in point of fact is known respecting this eminent personage in the annals of necromancy. His pretended history does not seem to have been written till about the year 1587, perhaps half a century after his death. This work is apparently in its principal features altogether fictitious. We have no reason however to deny the early statements as to his life. He is asserted by Camerarius and Wierus to have been born at Cundling, near Cracow, in the kingdom of Poland, and is understood to have passed the principal part of his life at the university of Wittenberg. He was probably well known to Cornelius Agrippa and Paracelsus. Melanchthon mentions him in his letters; and Conrad Gessner refers to him as a contemporary. The author of his life cites the opinions entertained respecting him by Luther. Philip Camerarius speaks of him in his ‘Horas Subsecivae’ as a celebrated name among magicians, apparently without reference to the life that has come down to us; and Wierus does the same thing. He was probably nothing more than an accomplished juggler, who appears to have practiced his art with great success in several towns of Germany. He was also no doubt a pretender to necromancy.”
— William Godwin (1834), Lives of Necromancers [3]

References
1. Godwin, William. (1793). An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice: and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness (Holbach, 5+ pgs). Oxford University Press, 2013.
2. Durant, Will. (1965). The Story of Civilization, Volume 9 The Age of Voltaire: a History of Civilization in Western Europe from 1715 to 1756, with Special Emphasis on the Conflict between Religion and Philosophy (Shelley, pg. 713). Simon & Schuster.
3. Godwin, William. (1834). Lives of Necromancers (pg. 199). Mason, 1876.

Further reading
● Godwin, William. (1793). An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice: and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness, Volume One. G.G.J and J. Robinson, Paternoster Row.
● Godwin, William. (1793). An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice: and its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness, Volume Two. G.G.J and J. Robinson, Paternoster Row.
● Shelley, Percy B. (1891). Letters from Percy Bysshe Shelley to William Godwin, Volume One. Publisher.

External links
William Godwin – Wikipedia.

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