Zeus

In religio-mythology, Zeus (TR:7) is

Amen
See main: God equivalence table
In 425BC, Herodotus, in his Histories, equated the Greek god Zeus with the Egyptian god Amen. [1]

“Then, holding the head before him and covering himself in the fleece, he showed himself to Heracles. This story explains why the Egyptians represent Zeus with a ram's head—a practice, which has extended to the Ammonians, who are a joint colony of Egyptians and Ethiopians ... So far as I can see, the Ammonians took their name too from the circumstance; for Amun is the Egyptian name for Zeus.”

In 300BC, Alexander the Great, in an attempt to unify his new kingdom under one religion, attempted to make Amen-Zeus or Zeus + Amen-Ra the new supreme god of the Greek empire.

In 100AD, Plutarch, in his On Isis and Osiris, stated things thusly: [2]

“Most people believe that Amoun is the name given to Zeus in the land of the Egyptians, a name which we, with slight alteration, pronounce Ammon.

Lucas Livingston (2002) elaborates on this as follows: [3]

“One of the most frequently mentioned deities in Herodotus' account of Egypt is ‘Theban Zeus’. Herodotus makes it abundantly clear that Zeus is known as Amun among the Egyptians. He relates a myth that he heard from the Egyptians at Thebes, the cult center of the ram-headed god Amun, where Heracles attempts to persuade Zeus to reveal his true form to him, but Zeus resists and devises a means by which to get around the issue. Zeus skins a ram and cuts off its head.”

Modern views seem to consider the connection or equivalence (Ѻ) between Zeus and Amen as status quo. [4]

References
1. (a) Herodotus. (c.425BC). Histories (Book 2, 42, 4-5). Publisher.
(b) Livingston, Lucas. (2002). “Egyptian Gods with Greek names in Herodotus and Votive Statuary” (Ѻ), Artic.edu, Jun 7.
2. Plutarch. (c.100AD). Isis and Osiris; in: Plutarch's Moralia, Volume Five (pg. 25) (Introduction: Victor Hanson). Harvard University Press.
3. Livingston, Lucas. (2002). “Egyptian Gods with Greek names in Herodotus and Votive Statuary” (Ѻ), Artic.edu, Jun 7.
4. Anon. (2007). “Egyptian Parallels to Greek Deities” (Ѻ), Atlantis Online, Feb 17.

External links
Zeus – Wikipedia.
Family tree of the Greek gods – Wikipedia.

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