Experience

Scientific model of human experience
Scottish German-languages scholar Gundula Sharman's 1997 lecture section header, from her conference presentation “Elective Affinities with Ireland: John Banville’s The Newton Letter and Goethe’s Die Wahlverwandtschaften”, on the relation between the work of John Banville and German polymath Johann Goethe’s 1809 physical chemistry base masterpiece Elective Affinities (Die Wahlverwandtschaften), the latter of which contains principles, about which Goethe famously defended in the street saying they were “true” and not immoral (Dec 1809), that, according to Sharman, define the “scientific model for human experience.” [1]
In terminology, experience refers to the various reaction states of the mind according to which sensory input is processed into mental imagery, views, thoughts, memories, and actions, etc., that come to constitute time differentials of one’s reaction existence.

Overview
In 1997, Gundula Sharman aptly described Goethe's Elective Affinities and its embedded human chemical theory as the "scientific model of human experience". [1]

Quotes

The following are related quotes:

“There is an insatiable desire in the human breast to resume in some short formula, some brief statement, the facts of human experience.”
Karl Pearson (1892), The Grammar of Science [2]

“Snow is the spokesperson for the technologico-Benthamite reduction of human experience to the quantifiable, the measurable, the manageable.”
Frank Leavis (1962), “The Significance of C.P. Snow” [1]

See also
Existence
Being

References
1. Sharman, Gundula. (1997). “Elective Affinities with Ireland: John Banville’s The Newton Letter and Goethe’s Die Wahlverwandtschaften”, in: The Novel in Anglo-German Context: Cultural Cross Currents and Affinities: Papers from the Conference Held at the University of Leeds from 15 to 17 September 1997 (pgs. 369-84; image, pgs. 372-73) (edited by Susan Stark). Rodopi, 2000.
2. Pearson, Karl. (1900). The Grammar of Science (pg. 36). Publisher.

External links
Experience – Wikipedia.

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