God character rescripts

Heliopolis creation myth 4In religio-mythology, god character rescripts, or "god character equivalents", refers to Egyptian god to Sumerian god to Indian, Greco-Roman, and Judeo-Christian god, character, or prophet equivalences; which resulted over time owing to cultural migrations, dynasty or empire recensions, and or general religious redaction, e.g. Hebrew scholars turning gods into prophets (Dunlap, 1858), Romans templating off Greek gods, e.g. Dionysus to Bacchus, and general intercultural wars and conquering.

Overview
The decoding of gods and religious characters from parallel sources, backwards to their original source and meaning is an intricate subject; a simple example being the comparison of Ovid's 8AD version of creation — namely the formation of the world out of chaos, the making of man "from clay", the fall of the original evil race of man, global flood, and the one righteous version of man and woman, namely Deucalion and Pyrrha, saved on a rowboat, landing on the world's one mountain — with the Biblical version of creation, which tells exactly the same story, with the substitution of the names Noah and Naamah. By backtracking, one can trace backwards through cultural time, to find the original source of this story.

Equivalence table
See also: Osiris rescripts
The following is a work-in-progress tabulation of the transliteration of physically real thing or phenomenon, e.g. 150 annual Nile River flood, to Egyptian god, to Indian character or god, to Greek god, to Roman god, to Judeo-Christian god or prophet equivalents, generally ordered per the standard Heliopolis creation myth cosmological appearance of things:




Mesopotamian mythology









Notes

Physical Thing
(Astro-Theology)
Egyptian
(3100-2400BC)
Egyptian mythology
Sumerian
(2100-1600BC)
Sumerian mythology
Akkadian
(1200BC)
Akkadian mythology
Babylonian
(1100BC)
Babylonian mythology
Assyrian
(700BC)
Assyrian mythology
Indian
(900BC)
Hindu mythology
Persian
(750BC)
Greek
(600BC)
Greek mythology
Roman
(400-10BC)
Roman
mythology
Hebrew
(300BC)
Jewish mythology
Christian
(200AD)
Christian mythology
Germanic
(700AD)
Nordic mythology
Muslim
(800AD)
Islamic mythology
Modern
(c.1800)
Scholar

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1.Nile River
N (Egyptian, Greek, English)
Nun (Nu)

Abzu
Nammu (water god)
ANu (sky water god)
Enki (god)
Utnapishtim (man)
Absu

Ea


VishNu (god)
MaNu (man)

Chaos
Nestis (Ѻ)
DeucalionNoah

Nuh

[10][13]


Naunet (Ѻ)






Pyrrha Naamah (wife)




[13]

Argo-Navis constellation → Nu’s solar barque → Ziusudra’s boat
→ Utnapishtim’s ship
Atrahasis’ boat

→ MaNu’s boat

RowboatNoah’s ark




[10](Ѻ)


Benu bird (phoenix)→ Dove, swallow, raven






→ Raven, dove, dove







Ogdoad



Sherma


Shem




(Ѻ)


Keme



Hama


Ham




(Ѻ)


Ptah [2800BC]



Jiapheta
HephaestusVulcanJapheth




[N6](Ѻ)
2.Pyramid (Primordial land)Atum [3000BC]



Atman
Adimo



Adam

Adam
Kant (c.1769)
Voltaire (c.1770)
[5][9]
(Ѻ)

















[6][7]







Heva
Pandora
Eve

Hawwa

(Ѻ)

MoralityMaat
(Ra’s daughter)






Dike
(Zeus’s daughter)
Justita
(Jupiter’s daughter)








Life







Vita







Death






ThanatosMor







Time




Shani
CronosSaturn






2.Sun
A (Egyptian, Greek, English)
Ra
UdUtu

Brahma
Helios
Abraham

Ibrahim
Postel (c.1570)[N4][9][10]


Amen [2000BC]




Zoroaster


Amen



[N2]


Amen-Ra [1500BC]





ZeusJupiter





[8]


Aten [1300BC]







Yahweh / YHWH







Apep

Tiamat










[14]
3.Sirius (Stella Maris)IsisInannaIshtar

Saraswati
Athena
Demeter (Ѻ)(Ѻ)

SarahVirgin Mary
Sara/Maryam

[8][12]

Milky WayHathor





AphroditeVenusEve

Hawa













Isaac

Ishaq


4.AirShu

Marduk


Atlas
Joshua




[11]
5.MoistureTefnut

Tiamat


ArtemisDiane





[6][11]
6.EarthGeb (Seb/Keb)Ki


Ganesha
Cronos/Gaia
Joseph

Yusuf

[4][9](Ѻ)
7.Heaven (Sky) NutAn




Rhea






[4]
8.Orion constellationOsirisTammuzDumuzi
SargonShiva (Ѻ) [15]ZoroasterDionysusBacchus
Serapis
MosesLazarus OdinMusaSanta Claus (Vossius, c.1630) [N1]










ZipporahZipporah




[N1]

→ Orion’s Belt (3 stars)









Three Kings





→ Orion’s dog (Canis Major) Anubis






Caleb[Moses' dog]John the Baptist
Yahya

[N1]


Horus
Tammuz



HerculesApollo





[14]


Osiris-Horus Ninurta (Ѻ)(Ѻ)


Buddha
Krishna
MithraAdonis

JesusThorIsa
(Cooper, 1877)
(Hislop, 1853)
[N3][N5]
9.[Name] constellationSet (Seth)



Satya

Typhon
Satan (Devil)

Shaytan




Nephthys








Mary Magdalene




10.MoonThoth
Theuth



Prometheus
Hermes







[4]


Min





Pan (Ѻ)


















Gabriel

Jibril
















Muhammad



(add)

Discussion
A large part of the above god character respect occurred in c.800BC when Greek mythology was formulated based on a rewrite of Egyptian mythology, owing to scholars, such as Thales and Homer, travelling to Egypt and studying under their priests and in their libraries.

The following is a table of Egyptian god to Greek quod equivalents, according to Herodotus, as adapted (Ѻ) from Ivan Linforth’s 1926 Greek Gods and Foreign Gods in Herodotus:

Egyptian god to Greek god equivalents

(add)

Quotes
The following are related quotes:

“Let me not be called a wicked atheist for seeing the likeness between Brahma and Abraham.’”
Godfrey Higgins (1833), Anacalypsis, Volume One (pg. 391)

“In this way antiquity disposes of its sun-gods. The Hebrews turned [the gods] into Patriarchs [see: god reduction]. Adam, Abraham, Israel, were names of Saturn. Edom is Adam; and the ancient usage was to name the nation, the land or city after the chief god. The Greeks made these deities founders of tribes.”
Samuel Dunlap (1858), Vestiges of the Spirit of Man

Herodotus found the similarity between the rites of Osiris and Dionysus so great, that he thought it impossible the latter could have arisen independently; they must, he thought, have been recently borrowed, with slight alternations, by the Greeks from the Egyptians.”
James Frazer (1907), Adonis, Attis, Osiris [2]

Plutarch's version of the myth of Isis and Osiris connects the various episodes, many of which can be documented from Egyptian sources, into a single, running narrative (On Isis and Osiris, 12-19). The story begins with Kronos (Geb, the Egyptian earth god) and Rhea (Nut, the Egyptian sky goddess) overcoming the curse of Helios (Re, the sun god) with the help of Hermes (Thoth, the Egyptian moon god) by producing five children on five intercalary days: Osiris, Horus, Typhon (Set), Isis, and Nephthys. As pharaoh of Egypt, Osiris brings civilization to that country and to the whole world. Typhon, however, gathers conspirators and plots to kill Osiris. First, he imprisons Osiris within a coffin and throws it into the Nile River, and later he dismembers the body of Osiris and scatters the pieces all around Egypt. One piece, the penis, is lost forever in the Nile River. In both episodes, the reproductive power of Osiris is sub-merged in the Nile. (Isis grieving and searching for Osiris and burning away the mortality of the infant prince of Byblos can be compared with …”
— Marvin Meyer (1999), The Ancient Mysteries (Ѻ)

“It is impossible to ignore the similarities between the Egyptian quarternity: Isis and Nephthys (known as 'the Two Goddesses' in Egypt), Osiris and Set (personifications of life and death), and the leading characters of the Eleusinian drama: Demeter and Persephone (also known simply as 'the Two Goddesses'), Dionysus and Hades. Diodorus of Sicily, first century BC, clearly states that the initiatory rites of Demeter in Eleusis were transferred from Egypt (Diodorus Siculus, 1.29.2). Later he states: The rite of Osiris is the same as that of Dionysus and that of Isis very similar to that of Demeter; the names alone having been interchanged, and the punishments in Hades of the unrighteous, the Fields of the Righteous and the fantastic conceptions, current among the many - all these were introduced by Orpheus in imitation of the Egyptian funeral customs.' (1.96.4-5).”
Timothy Freke and Peter Gandy (2001), Jesus and the Lost Goddess [3]

“Stories of Hindu heroes: Adimo, Heva, Sherma, Hama and Jiapheta apparently were replicated into legends about: Adam, Eve, Shem, Ham, and Japeth.”
— Gore Burnelli (2008) (Ѻ)

See also
Egyptian-to-Christian transliteration
Mangnall’s abstract of Heathen mythology

Notes
N1. Osiris, Dionysus-Bacchus, and Moses
N2. Supreme god timeline
N3. Buddhism
N4. Abraham and Brahma
N5. Christ myth theory
N6. (a) Memphis creation myth
(b) Hermopolis creation myth

References
2. Frazer, James. (1907). Adonis, Attis, Osiris (pg. 357). MacMillan.
3. Freke, Timothy and Grandy, Peter. (2001). Jesus and the Lost Goddess: The Secret Teachings of the Original Christians (Osiris, 18+ pgs; quote, pg. 255). Random House.
4. Meyer, Marvin. (1999). The Ancient Mysteries: a Sourcebook of Sacred Texts (pg. 160). University of Pennsylvania Press.
5. Greenberg, Gary. (2000). 101 Myths of the Bible: How Ancient Scribes Invented Biblical History (Adam = Atum, pgs. 46-47). Source Books.
6. Anon. (2007). “Egyptian Parallels to Greek Deities” (Ѻ), Atlantis Online, Feb 17.
7. Egyptian and Greek God Comparisons – Rioradan Wiki.
8. Plutarch. (c.100AD). Isis and Osiris; in: Plutarch's Moralia, Volume Five (pg. 25) (Introduction: Victor Hanson). Harvard University Press.
9. (a) Kant, Immanuel. (1769). Publication. Publisher.
(b) Hecht, Jennifer M. (2003). Doubt: A History: The Great Doubters and Their Legacy of Innovation from Socrates and Jesus to Thomas (Adam = Adimo; Abraham = Braham; Joseph = Ganesha, pg. 367). HarperOne.
10. Sumerian creation myth – Wikipedia.
11. (a) Tiamat – Wikipedia.
(b) Babylonian religion – Wikipedia.
(c) Enuma Elis – Wikipedia.
(d) Peterson, Jordan. (1999). Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief (atheism, pgs. 6, 452, 448; Osiris, 8+ pgs; Tiamat, 10+ pgs). Publisher.
12. (a) Campbell, Joseph. (1976). The Masks of God: Occidental Mythology (pg. 70). Penguin Books.
(b) Ishtar – Wikipedia.
(c) Tammuz (deity) – Wikipedia.
13. Ovid. (8AD). Metamorphosis: Stories of Changing Form (§:Introduction, pgs. v-ix) (translator and introduction: Rolfe Humphries) (Deucalion and Pyrrha, pgs. 12-13). Indiana University Press, 1955.
14. Cheyne, Thomas K. (1907). Traditions and Beliefs of Ancient Israel (pgs. 4-5). A. and C. Black.
15. Georg Creuzer (c.1837) (Ѻ) identified Shiva with Osiris and Baccus.

External links
List of Germanic deities – Wikipedia.

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