God talk

God Talk (1967)
Scottish-born theologian, philosopher and Anglican priest John Macquarrie’s 1967 book God-Talk: an Examination of the Language and Logic of Theology, is said to have introduced the phrase “god talk” into the colloquial vernacular.
In terminology, god talk, or “God-talk”, akin to “bibledygook” (Ѻ), synonymous to “God language” (Oliver, 1984), is a generic term refering to religious-themed and or god-centric language, ideas, and theory.

Etymology
The term “God-Talk”, as a characterization of the language of theology, according to Harold Oliver (1984), is attributed to the publication of Scottish-born theologian, philosopher and Anglican priest John Macquarrie’s 1967 book God-Talk: an Examination of the Language and Logic of Theology: [1]

“Lest it seem that relational hermeneutics is insensitive to the religious dimensions of myths, I shall attempt to explicate in relational terms what the expression ‘of the gods’ means within mythic consciousness. What follows is intended to apply with equal validity to originative religious stories and to statements of belief modeled on them. The first step toward this explication is the simple translation of the phrase ‘stories of gods’ into the generic formulation of God Language. Some might prefer the term ‘God-Talk’, suggested by Macquarrie [1967], but they must bear in mind that he coined it as a characterization of theology. God-Language seems to me best suited to represent the distinctive dimension of mythical...”

Quotes
The following are related quotes:

“Why do we interject god-talk into our language? One reason, I suppose, is because we think in this way we clear up mysteries. Thus we use sentences like ‘God knows,’ or ‘God must want it that way,’ or ‘It must have been the will of God’ to avoid using sentences like ‘I don't know,’ or ‘I am totally ignorant,’ or ‘It was a chance event.’ The fact that we appeal to a mystery to explain a mystery will not be pointed out to us by most people because their critical faculties are blunted by our pious appeal to deity. Only a philosopher, or some other cantankerous person, will call out attention to the emptiness of our way of removing mysteries.”
— Troy Wilson Organ (c.1975), “God-Talk and Beyond” (Ѻ) (Ѻ)

“We can talk about anything we want – I’m happy to talk about consciousness – but please notice that when we migrate away from the God that is really shaping human events or the God-talk that is really shaping human events in our world at this moment …”
— Sam Harris (2010), debate with Deepak Chopra, Mar 23 (Ѻ)

See also
God’s energy
● God’s work
● God’s power
● God’s force

Reference
1. (a) Macquarrie, John. (1967). God-Talk: an Examination of the Language and Logic of Theology. S.C.M. Press.
(b) Oliver, Harold. H. (1984). Relatedness: Essays in Metaphysics and Theology (pg. 61). Mercer University Press.

External links
● Who uses the term “God-talk” and what do they mean? (Ѻ) – StackExchange.com.

TDics icon ns

More pages