Hmolscience periodic table

In hmolscience, hmolscience periodic table or "human molecular periodic table" (compare: human periodic table), is a periodic table with focus on those elements found to have functional activity in the composition and structure of a person, one individual human technically defined as a human molecule or atomic geometry.

Human molecular periodic table | 26-element standard
The following, from Libb Thims 2020 Human Chemical Thermodynamics, is a labeled and color-coded human periodic table: [9]

HPT 3

The following under-construction interactive (hyperlinked) hmolscience periodic table shows the 26 functional elements in one human molecule (person), according to the Thims human molecular formula calculation, done by American electrochemical engineer Libb Thims (2002), which, includes all 20 of the so-called "Webb elements" of marine invertebrates, plus six found, according to in depth study of human physiology, to have active function in the human: [1]

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18













IntellectPowerBody

1
H
1.007












(animation)
(energy)
(fluidity)

2
He
4.003
3
Li
6.941
4
Be
9.012










5
B
10.81
6
C
12.01
7
N
14.01
8
O
16.00
9
F
19.00
10
Ne
20.18
11
Na
22.99
12
Mg
24.31










13
Al
26.98
14
Si
28.09
15
P
30.97
16
S
32.07
17
Cl
35.45
18
Ar
39.95
19
K
39.10
20
Ca
40.08
21
Sc
44.96
22
Ti
47.88
23
V
50.94
24
Cr
52.00
25
Mn
54.94
26
Fe
55.85
27
Co
58.93
28
Ni
58.69
29
Cu
63.55
30
Zn
65.39
31
Ga
69.72
32
Ge
72.59
33
As
74.92
34
Se
78.96
35
Br
79.90
36
Kr
83.80
37
Rb
85.47
38
Sr
87.62
39
Y
88.62
40
Zr
91.22
41
Nb
92.91
42
Mo
95.94
43
Tc
(98)
44
Ru
101.1
45
Rh
102.9
46
Pd
106.4
47
Ag
107.9
48
Cd
112.4
49
In
114.8
50
Sn
118.7
51
Sb
121.8
52
Te
127.6
53
I
126.0
54
Xe
131.3
55
Cs
132.9
56
Ba
137.3
57
La
138.9
72
Hf
178.5
73
Ta
180.9
74
W
183.9
75
Re
183.9
76
Os
190.2
77
Ir
192.2
78
Pt
195.1
79
Au
197.0
80
Hg
200.6
81
Tl
204.4
82
Pb
207.2
83
Bi
209.0
84
Po
(210)
85
At
(210)
86
Rn
(222)
87
Fr
(223)
88
Ra
(226)
89
Ac
(227)
104
Rf
(257)
105
Ha
(260)
106
Sg
(263)
107
Ns
(262)
108
Hs
(262)
109
Mt
(266)
110
111
112




























58
Ce
140.1
59
Pr
140.9
60
Nd
144.2
61
Pm
(147)
62
Sm
150.4
63
Eu
152.0
64
Gd
157.3
65
Tb
158.9
66
Dy
162.5
67
Ho
164.9
68
Er
167.3
69
Tm
168.9
70
Yb
173.0
71
Lu
175.0




90
Th
232.0
91
Pa
(231)
92
U
238.0
93
Np
(237)
94
Pu
(242)
95
Am
(243)
96
Cm
(247)
97
Bk
(247)
98
Cf
(249)
99
Es
(254)
100
Fm
(253)
101
Md
(256)
102
No
(254)
103
Lr
(257)


Human molecular periodic table | Relative abundance by percent mass
The following shows the same table, albeit listed with percent mass of each element found in the human, with element symbol approximately sized according to relative abundance in the human, modeled loosely on American chemist William Sheehan's 1970 periodic table of elements, shown a center, according to relative abundance on the earth's surface, shown adjacent:

1
H
10









2
He

3
Li
4
Be



5
B
0.00003
6
C
23
7
N
2.6
8
O
61
9
F
0.004
10
Ne

11
Na
0.17
12
Mg
0.029


13
Al
14
Si
0.001
15
P
1.1
16
S
0.2
17
Cl
0.18
18
Ar

19
K
0.3
20
Ca
1.4
21
Sc

22
Ti

23
V
0.0000002
24
Cr
0.00002
25
Mn
0.0002
26
Fe
0.012
27
Co
0.000004
28
Ni
0.0002
29
Cu
0.0003
30
Zn
0.003
31
Ga

32
Ge

33
As

34
Se
0.00002
35
Br
36
Kr

37
Rb

38
Sr

39
Y

40
Zr

41
Nb

42
Mo
0.000007
43
Tc

44
Ru

45
Rh

46
Pd

47
Ag

48
Cd

49
In

50
Sn
0.00003
51
Sb

52
Te

53
I
0.00003
54
Xe

55
Cs

56
Ba

57
La

72
Hf

73
Ta

74
W

75
Re

76
Os

77
Ir
78
Pt

79
Au

80
Hg

81
Tl

82
Pb

83
Bi

84
Po

85
At

86
Rn

87
Fr

88
Ra

89
Ac

104
Rf

105
Ha

106
Sg

107
Ns

108
Hs

109
Mt

110
111
112




























58
Ce

59
Pr

60
Nd

61
Pm

62
Sm

63
Eu

64
Gd

65
Tb

66
Dy

67
Ho

68
Er

69
Tm

70
Yb

71
Lu





90
Th

91
Pa

92
U

93
Np

94
Pu

95
Am

96
Cm

97
Bk

98
Cf

99
Es

100
Fm

101
Md

102
No

103
Lr


Key
The following is a key to the human periodic table (hmolscience periodic table), shown with the generic symbol El short for Element, above which is the atomic number, below which is the atomic mass:

#
Element
mass

Elements with symbols bolded and in double boarders signify one of the 6 elements of the "living substance itself" (Frank Thone, 1936), in Hill order (Edwin Hill, 1900); or elements of the CHNOPS nomenclature of Frank Thone (1936) and or the "powered CHNOPS systems" chemically-neutral (life terminology upgrade) terminology of Henry Swan (1974).




#
Element
mass

Thick boarders signify one of the 20 elements found measurable in marine invertebrates (David Webb, 1937); hence, by evolution timeline repercussion, core to human element composition.




#
Element
mass

Elements with shaded light yellow boxes signify the 22 elements found in BOTH the Sterner-Elser human molecular formula (2000) and the Thims human molecular formula (2002).




#
Element
mass

Elements with shaded light blue boxes signify the 4 elements NOT found in the Sterner-Elser human molecular formula (2000) but found in the more precise Thims human molecular formula (2002).

By classification, the above logic indicates that one human molecule is comprised of 10 nonmetallic elements (H, C, N, O, F, P, S, Cl, Se, and I), 2 metalloids (B, Si), and 14 metals (Na, Mg, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, and Sn) — defining one human, in technical terms, as a "nonmetallic-metalloid-metal molecule", or in chemical thermodynamic speak a "powered CHNOPS system" (Henry Swan, 1974), or more fully a bound state nonmetallic-metalloid-metal heat-driven turnover rate surface-attached freely-running albeit-coupled animate CHNOPS-based 26-element reactive evolving chemical species. [1]

Thims | Sterner-Elser element differences
The 22-elements shown bolded and highlighted (yellow = Thims-Sterner-Elser elements; blue = Thims-elements, not found in the Sterner-Elser calculation) are the 22-elements found in the 2000 Sterner-Elser human molecular formula calculation, as found in their Ecological Stoichiometry: the Biology of the Elements from Molecules to the Biosphere (2002), which differs by the four elements, namely: boron B, vanadium V, nickel Ni, and molybdenum Mo, each of which are found to have physiological activity inside an animated human:

#
Name
Symbol
CPK
(jmol)
%
Mass
PictureZFunction
19BoronBB0.00003Boron5A trace mineral essential for healthy bones.
23NickelNiNi0.0002Nickel28May be a factor in hormone, lipid, and membrane metabolism and cell integrity. Significant amounts are found in DNA and RNA. May be involved in glucose metabolism, etc.
24MolybdenumMoMo0.000007Molybdenum42Is an essential part of two enzymes: xanthine oxidase—which aids in the mobilization of iron from the liver reserves and helps change iron from ferrous to ferric, and aldehyde oxidase—which is necessary for the oxidation of fats. It is also a factor in copper metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, and the final stages of urine production, ect.
26VanadiumVV0.0000002Vanadium23Has been shown to reverse diabetes. Inhibits cholesterol synthesis. Bones, cartilage, and teeth require it for proper development. It has been shown to have a function in cellular metabolism, iron metabolism, and red blood cell growth, etc.

which are included in the 2002 Thims human molecular formula, a more exacting calculation that has found acceptance recently in the thermodynamics community. [4]

History
It remains to be determined who exactly made a periodic table showing elements found in a human.

In 1899, English physiologist John Thornton stated that 14 elements enter into the composition of the human body: oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulphur, phosphorus, chlorine, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, fluorine, and silicon; and noted that other elements, such as manganese and lead (anti-element: poison), have sometimes been found in small quantities. [7]

In the mid 20th century, tables listing "elements" in living things and humans began to appear; the following are two early tables of elements in "living systems" and "man", respectively:

Webb | 1937
Morowitz | 1968

Atoms of living systems (1968)Elements in Man (Morowitz, 1968)
Left: in 1937, Irish botanist David Webb, in association with F.R. Fearon, in their “Studies on the Ultimate Composition of Biological Materials”, did spectrographic calculations and measurements on marine invertebrates that produced the above 20-element table. [6] Right: in 1968, American bio-chemist Harold Morowitz, in his Energy Flow in Biology, citing the previous 20-element work of David Webb (1937) and the so-called "CHNOPS system" (see: CHNOPS) nomenclature of George Armstrong (1964), produced the above 22-element table of the elements of man, alfalfa, copepod, and bacteria. [7]

Morowitz, above (right), includes all of Webb’s 20 marine invertebrate elements, less three: boron B (5), cobalt Co (27), and Molybdenum Mo (42), and adds five: rubidium Rb (37), bromine Br (35), tin Sn (50, manganese Mn (25), and aluminum Al (13), though it seems without justified explanation.

In 1989, English chemist John Emsley published his famous The Elements, in which devoted several pages to each element, out of which, in total, he gave the figure that “59-elements are in humans”. This figure, is an overestimate, by some 33 elements.

Nevertheless, many have used this Emsley estimate figure as a basis to give citations of human element and or formula count, e.g. Kathryn Harkup (2013) (Ѻ) or Joe Hanson (Ѻ) (2015) to name two examples (see: human molecular formula).

Breaking Bad (logo)

Breaking Bad
In 2008, American writer-producer Vince Gilligan launched his now-famous television black humor drama Breaking Bad, wherein the title, names of actors and producers, were presented using “chemical letter” (or chemical alphabet) stylization, e.g. Bryan Cranston (Walter White), lead character, aka “Professor White”; the show intro also uses a green gas, crystal meth stylized periodic table. Going into the second season (c.2009), approximately, American organic chemist Donna Nelson (Ѻ) approached (Ѻ) Gilligan offering to lend help in the area of scientific accuracy, and thereafter began act as the scientific advisor to the show. [8]

In the third episode, “… And the Bag’s in the River”, season one, the show opens to Professor White cleaning up the human that had been dissolved in hydrofluoric acid, amid which his mind reflects back to, it seems, college days, a dialogue with a woman, possibly his lover at the time, wherein she reads off the elements of a human to him and he writes them down on a chalkboard, commenting in the end how he thinks that something is missing, to which the woman replies “the soul”?

Breaking Bad (soul scene) s

In 2013, Kirth Gerson, in his “Breaking Bad Pilot: People are Chemicals, Too!” class video lecture, analyzed Breaking Bad as a type of each human is an element (or chemical) reacting in a social system that makes chemicals, a sort of modern Elective Affinities analysis, so to say. [8]

The following is a circa 2014 25-element Breaking Bad inspired human chemistry stylized wallpaper periodic table of the elements in a human, sourced from somewhere (Ѻ), with the inclusion of arsenic As as one of the elements in the human molecule:

Periodic table (Breaking Bad)

The following is an elements in a human labeled periodic table, from the online book General Chemistry: Principles, Patterns, and Applications by Bruce Averill and Patricia Eldredge: (Ѻ)

elements in human

The following are some other recent human composition listings:

Human (25-element diagram)Human (26-element table)
Left: a 25-element diagram of the elements in a human by abundance, divided into main elements (11) and trace (14), which agrees with the Thims formula calculation, with the exception of nickel (Ni). (Ѻ) Right: a 26-element table of elements found in the human, divided by common (13) and trace (13) elements, which agrees with the Thims formula calculation, with lacking of vanadium V (23) and nickel (28) and the addition aluminum Al (13) and cadmium Cd (48). (Ѻ)

The following are two semi-recent elements in humans diagrams:

Human (29 element diagram)elemental-composition-by-mass-human-body-health-infographic
Left: the top 18-elements by mass in a human (Ѻ). Right: an older 29-element human composition diagram (Ѻ).

The first "hmolscience" periodic table was published by American electrochemical engineer Libb Thims online in 2006 as follows: [1]

Periodic Table of the Elements of the Human Being (color)

The first hmolscience periodic table, published in book format, was the 2008 "Periodic Table of the Elements of the Human Being" table, a black and white reprint of the above, showing the 26 functional elements of the human molecule, found in Thims' The Human Molecule. [2]

The following, based on Thims' calculations of the 26 elements of the human molecule, is English chemical engineering student turned biotechnologist Mark Janes' 2012 rendition of the hmolscience periodic table, in respect to his carbon entromorphology theory: [3]

Janes periodic table

(add)

See also
Floating magnets experiment
Human molecular formula
Human periodic table
● Periodic table of social structures

References
1. Periodic table – HumanThermodynamics.com.
2. Thims, Libb. (2008). The Human Molecule (issuu) (preview) (Google Books) (docstoc). LuLu.
3. Janes, Mark A. (2012). Mr Carbon Atom and the Theory of Carbon Entromorphology (pgs. 264-67) (abs). Emp3books.
4. Annamalai, Kalyan, Puri, Ishwar K., and Jog, Milind A. (2011). Advanced Thermodynamics Engineering (§14: Thermodynamics and Biological Systems, pgs. 709-99, contributed by Kalyan Annamalai and Carlos Silva; §14.4.1: Human body | Formulae, pgs. 726-27; Thims, ref. 88). CRC Press.
5. Thornton, John. (1899). Human Physiology (14 elements in human body, pg. 412). Longman’s Green.
6. (a) Webb, D.A. and Fearon, W.R. (1937). “Studies on the Ultimate Composition of Biological Materials. Part I. Aims, Scope and Methods”, Sci. Proc. Roy. Dublin Soc. 21:487-504.
(b) Webb, D.A. (1937). “Studies on the Ultimate Composition of Biological Materials. Part II. Spectrographic Analyses of Marine Invertebrates with Special Reference to the Chemical Composition of Their Environment”, Sci. Proc. Roy. Dublin Soc. 21:505-539.
(c) D.A. Webb – Wikipedia.
(d) Morowitz, Harold. (1968). Energy Flow in Biology: Biological Organization as a Problem in Thermal Physics (table 3-1, pg. 47). Academic Press.
7. Morowitz, Harold. (1968). Energy Flow in Biology: Biological Organization as a Problem in Thermal Physics (table 3-2, pg. 48). Academic Press.
8. Gerson, Kirth. (2013). “Breaking Bad Pilot: People are Chemicals, Too!” (Ѻ), The University of College, Sep 2.
9. Thims, Libb. (2020). Human Chemical Thermodynamics — Chemical Thermodynamics Applied to the Humanities: Meaning, Morality, Purpose; Sociology, Economics, History, Philosophy, Government, Anthropology, Politics, Business, Jurisprudence; Religion, Relationships, Warfare, and Love (pdf). Publisher.

Further reading
● Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume One). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.
● Thims, Libb. (2007). Human Chemistry (Volume Two). Morrisville, NC: LuLu.

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