Molecular thermodynamics

In thermodynamics, molecular thermodynamics is thermodynamics with specific reference to molecular theory. [1]

Etymology
The term “molecular thermodynamics”, becoming common in the 1960s, is used, in some sense, to contrast with that of classical thermodynamics, which is often said to be independent of atomic and molecular models. [2] The subject of the "thermodynamics of molecular species", seems to be a newer variation presented as a modernized chemical thermodynamics, of the updated Willard Gibbs (1876) Gilbert Lewis (1923) variety, with focus on issues germane to topics in those areas such as mechanistic chemistry or solution chemistry. [3]

References
1. Dickerson, Richard E. (1969). Molecular Thermodynamics. London: The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.
2. McQuarrie, Donald. A. and Simon, John D. (1999). Molecular Thermodynamics. University Science Books.
3. Grunwald, Ernest. (1997). Thermodynamics of Molecular Species. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Further reading
● Fay, James A. (1965). Molecular Thermodynamics (snippet). Addison-Wesley.
● Schoffeniels, Ernest and Mărgineanu, D.G. (1991). Molecular Basis and Thermodynamics of Bioelectrogenesis. Springer.
Grunwald, Ernest. (1997). Thermodynamics of Molecular Species. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
● Hanson, Robert M. and Green, Susan. (2008). Introduction to Molecular Thermodynamics (Preface) (T.O.C) (ch. 1: Probability, Distributions, and Equilibrium, pgs. 1-22). University Science Books.
● Lee, Lloyd, L. and Lee, Rachel. (2008). Molecular Thermodynamics of Electrolyte Solutions. World Scientific.
● Lu, Xiaohua. (2009). Molecular Thermodynamics of Complex Systems. Springer.

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