Physics

In science, physics is the study of the laws that determine the structure of the universe with reference to the matter and energy of which it consists. It is concerned with the forces that exist between objects and the interrelationship between matter and energy. [1]

Etymology
The term physis (φύσις), supposedly, comes from phyein (φύειν), "to grow", related to our word "be"; possibly deriving from Thales. (Ѻ)

Overview
In 320BC, Aristotle introduced term "physics", in parallel with "metaphysics", as the study of things, in short.

In circa 1610, Francis Bacon, building on Aristotle, defined physics, a sub-branch of philosophy, as follows: [3]

Philosophy
1. Divine philosophy
2. Natural philosophy
2.1. Speculative philosophy (or natural science)
2.1.1. Physics
2.1.1.1. The doctrine of the formation of things
2.1.1.2. The doctrine of the formation of things, or the world
2.1.1.3. The doctrine concerning the variety of things [metamorphosis or evolution]
2.1.2. Metaphysics
2.1.2.1. The doctrine of forms
2.1.2.2. The doctrine of final causes
2.2. Practical philosophy
3. Human philosophy

In 1830s, the word “physicist” began to appear in English, e.g. as used in the Whewell-Coleridge debate (1833). [2]

References
1. Daintith, John. (2005). Oxford Dictionary of Physics. New York: Oxford University Press.
2. Morus, Iwan R. (2005). When Physics Became King (pg. 141). University of Chicago Press.
3. (a) Bacon, Francis. (c.1610). The Works of Francis Bacon: with an Introductory Essay and a Portrait, Volume One. London: Henry G. Bohn, 1850.
(b) Bacon, Francis. (c.1610). The Works of Francis Bacon: with an Introductory Essay and a Portrait, Volume Two. London: Henry G. Bohn, 1850.

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