Scientific model of human experience

In models, scientific model of human experience refers to the working description by which modern science describes and understands states of human experience, particularly as seen from the purview of the modern Faustian mindset.

Overview
In 1809, Goethe, cited with an IQ of 225 in 1925, published his human chemical theory based novella Elective Affinities, which Gundula Sharman (1997) has aptly characterized this as the “scientific model of human experience”; the gist visual of which being shown below left, as compared to the upgraded 2000 version, described in human chemical thermodynamics terms, of this model as described by Christopher Hirata, cited with an IQ of 225 in 1996, below right: [1]

Goethe-Hirata comparison

In 2014, Leon Cooper, in his Science and the Human Experience: Mephistopheles is Alive and Well and Living in the Space Age – Values, Culture, and Mind, opening to Goethe, attempted to stitch out the intersection between science and human feelings and experience, via a series of previous published essays and talks. [2]

References
1. (a) Sharman, Gundula. (1997). “Elective Affinities with Ireland: John Banville’s The Newton Letter and Goethe’s Die Wahlverwandtschaften”, in: The Novel in Anglo-German Context: Cultural Cross Currents and Affinities: Papers from the Conference Held at the University of Leeds from 15 to 17 September 1997 (pgs. 369-84; image, pgs. 372-73) (edited by Susan Stark). Rodopi, 2000.
(b) Hirata, Christopher M. (c.2000). “The Physics of Relationships” (section: Fun) (abs) (WB) (Yumpu) , Tapir.Caltech.edu; (WayBack Machine).
(c) Hirata, Christopher M. (2010). "The Physics of Relationships", Journal of Human Thermodynamics, 6(5): 62-76.
2. (a) Cooper, Leon N. (1976). Science and the Human Experience: Mephistopheles is Alive and Well and Living in the Space Age – Values, Culture, and Mind (Amz) (Goethe, 6+ pgs). Cambridge University Press.
(b) Lynch, Gary S. (2015). “Leon N. Cooper’s Science and Human Experience: Values, Culture, and the Mind” (Ѻ), Cerebrum, Dana.org, Aug 3.

Further reading
● Proctor, James D. (2005). Science, Religion, and Human Experience. Oxford University Press.

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