Woman

Male female molecular symbols (c.2002)
A c.2002 photo of hand-written notes by Libb Thims, in the front matter of his copy of Matt Ridley’s Genome: the Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters (1999), wherein he is attempting to formulate a chemical symbol notation for a male Mx, female Fy, and baby Bc, per the reproductive reaction.
In terminology, woman (TR:211), female (TR:152) or women (TR:163), as contrasted with a man, or alternatively hermaphrodite (an animal or plant having both male and female reproductive organs), is bipedal primate mammal, of reproductive age, with an XX 23-chromosome, as contrasted with an individual with an XY 23-chromosome (male).

Overview
In 1995, Libb Thims, chemical thermodynamically, had the following basic human reproduction reaction model in mind:

Male + Female → Baby

In 2001, Thims playing with the "s" symbol meaning "solid" as used in chemistry:

M(s) + F(s) goes to B(c) (2001)

In c.2002, hand-written notes by American electrochemical engineer Libb Thims, in the front matter of his copy of Matt Ridley’s Genome: the Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters (1999), wherein he is attempting to formulate a chemical symbol notation for a male Mx, female Fy, and baby Bc, per the reproductive reaction, Thims had in mind, in his early years of theory development (1995-2003):

Mx + Fy → Bc

In 2003, however, Thims came to the realization that, contrary to his previously incorrectly conceptualized model, above, the human reproduction reaction was in fact a double displacement reaction, and not a combination reaction; correctly:

AB + CD → AC + BD

where the molecular components "B" and "D" are the germ cells of each person, i.e. sperm and egg, AC is a dihumanide molecule, in possession of a human chemical bond "A≡C", in which a quantifiable amount of Gibbs free energy is stored, in the form of bond energy, per the Fritz Lipmann coupling theory, and BD is the newly-formed child at the point of parental detachment (age 18). Prior to this, Thims, of note, had assumed, in his formulation, that the parents "died off", somewhere along the line, and that all that mattered between initial state and final state was the couple at first collision (meeting) and the fully formed product (adult child). In the correct view, he realized that (a) the Gibb energy stored in the intact marriage bond "A≡C" was a large missing piece of the calculation and (b) no one, to his knowledge, had yet formulated a theory of the "human chemical bond", in a scientific quantitative sense.

In 2005, resultingly, Thims attempted to draft the online article On the Nature of the Human Chemical Bond”, which halted when it became evidence that the subject would not fit on one webpage; nevertheless, the effort did result in (a) the Journal of Human Chemical Thermodynamics and (b) the two-volume textbook Human Chemistry. [4]

Quotes
The following are noted quotes:

“Just as man and woman attract one another, so oxygen attracts hydrogen, and, in loving union with it, forms water, that mighty omnipresent element, without which no life nor thought would be possible.”
Ludwig Buchner (c.1880), quoted by Henry Finck (1887) as an example of gross materialism [1]

“Just as man and woman attract one another, so oxygen attracts hydrogen, and, in loving union with it, forms water, that mighty omnipresent element, without which no life nor thought would be possible.”
Ludwig Buchner (c.1880), quoted by Henry Finck (1887) as an example of gross materialism [1]

“I am not prepared to deny or assert any proposition which concerns myself; but certainly this solitary struggle with platitudinous atoms, called men and women by courtesy, leads me to wish for my wife again. How did I ever hit on the only woman in the world who fits my cravings and never sounds hollow anywhere? Social chemistry—the mutual attraction of equivalent human molecules—is a science yet to be created, for the fact is my daily study and only satisfaction in life.”
Henry Adams (1885), Letter to wife Clover Adams, Apr 12 [3]

“At one point, a minority of some of the more extreme Christians (following Aristotle) doubted whether women had souls, or at least had souls of the same quality as men.”
Francis Crick (1995), The Astonishing Hypothesis [2]

“Women initiate negotiations four times less often than men, resulting in getting less of what they want—promotion opportunities, plum assignments, and higher pay.”
— Selena Rezvani (2012), Pushback: How Smart Women Ask – and Stand Up – For What They Want (ΡΊ)

See also
● IQ: 150+ | Smartest woman ever
● Male-female reaction

References

1. Finck, Henry. (1887). Romantic Love and Personal Beauty: Their Development, Causal Relations, Historic and National Peculiarities (section: Cosmic Attraction and Chemical Affinities, pgs 4-9). MacMillan.
2. Crick, Francis. (1995). The Astonishing Hypothesis: the Scientific Search for the Soul (pg. 4). Simon and Schuster.
3. (a) Adams, Henry. (1885). “Letter to Marian Adams”, April 12.
(b) Adams, Henry. (1989). The Letters of Henry Adams: 1892-1899, Volume 4 (equivalent human molecules, pg. xxviii). Harvard University Press.
4. Thims, Libb. (2005). “On the Nature of the Human Chemical Bond” (un-finished). Journal of Human Thermodynamics, Vol. 1, Issue 5, pgs. 36-67. December.

External links
● Woman – Wikipedia.

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